open access

Vol 86, No 1 (2015)
ARTICLES
Get Citation

Postpartum levator ani muscle injuries. Diagnosis and treatment

Michał Chojnacji, Dariusz Borowski, Mirosław Wielgoś, Piotr Węgrzyn
DOI: 10.17772/gp/1902
·
Ginekol Pol 2015;86(1).

open access

Vol 86, No 1 (2015)
ARTICLES

Abstract

Levator ani muscle (LAM) injuries are much more frequent than trauma to sphincter ani muscles, but so far they have been omitted in obstetric handbooks. Levator ani avulsion is observed only after vaginal delivery. Forceps delivery, second stage of labor ≥110 min., fetal head circumference ≥ 35 cm, episiotomy and coincidence of anal sphincter trauma are risk factors for levator ani avulsion. The most vital issue in that type of trauma is pelvic organ prolapse and 2-4-fold higher risk of recurrence after prolapse surgery. The current level of evidence does not allow to conclusively determine the of role of levator avulsion in urinary incontinence. Levator injuries are occult, what constitutes the main diagnostic problem. Until recently, magnetic resonance imaging has been the only diagnostic method until the development of 3-dimensional ultrasound. Nowadays, 3-D ultrasound is an essential technique in static and functional diagnosis of the levator ani. There are no effective methods of levator trauma prevention. Except the risk factors reduction, there are some pilot data about positive role of antepartal perineal muscle training. Physiotherapy plays the main role in reducing the effects of levator trauma. Mesh techniques are the most effective operative methods in coincident pelvic organ prolapse with levator avulsion, but there is still a 2-fold higher risk of recurrence.

Abstract

Levator ani muscle (LAM) injuries are much more frequent than trauma to sphincter ani muscles, but so far they have been omitted in obstetric handbooks. Levator ani avulsion is observed only after vaginal delivery. Forceps delivery, second stage of labor ≥110 min., fetal head circumference ≥ 35 cm, episiotomy and coincidence of anal sphincter trauma are risk factors for levator ani avulsion. The most vital issue in that type of trauma is pelvic organ prolapse and 2-4-fold higher risk of recurrence after prolapse surgery. The current level of evidence does not allow to conclusively determine the of role of levator avulsion in urinary incontinence. Levator injuries are occult, what constitutes the main diagnostic problem. Until recently, magnetic resonance imaging has been the only diagnostic method until the development of 3-dimensional ultrasound. Nowadays, 3-D ultrasound is an essential technique in static and functional diagnosis of the levator ani. There are no effective methods of levator trauma prevention. Except the risk factors reduction, there are some pilot data about positive role of antepartal perineal muscle training. Physiotherapy plays the main role in reducing the effects of levator trauma. Mesh techniques are the most effective operative methods in coincident pelvic organ prolapse with levator avulsion, but there is still a 2-fold higher risk of recurrence.
Get Citation

Keywords

pelvic floor / three-dimensional ultrasound / muscle levator ani / delivery adverse effects

About this article
Title

Postpartum levator ani muscle injuries. Diagnosis and treatment

Journal

Ginekologia Polska

Issue

Vol 86, No 1 (2015)

DOI

10.17772/gp/1902

Bibliographic record

Ginekol Pol 2015;86(1).

Keywords

pelvic floor / three-dimensional ultrasound / muscle levator ani / delivery adverse effects

Authors

Michał Chojnacji
Dariusz Borowski
Mirosław Wielgoś
Piotr Węgrzyn

Regulations

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk
tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl