dostęp otwarty

Tom 4, Nr 2 (2018)
Prace poglądowe
Opublikowany online: 2018-08-17
Pobierz cytowanie

Rola równowagi oksydacyjno-antyoksydacyjnej w etiopatogenezie bielactwa nabytego

Laura Nowowiejska, Anna Niezgoda, Aleksandra Grzanka, Rafał Czajkowski, Czanita Cieścińska, Alina Woźniak, Karolina Szewczyk-Golec
Forum Dermatologicum 2018;4(2):63-69.

dostęp otwarty

Tom 4, Nr 2 (2018)
Prace poglądowe
Opublikowany online: 2018-08-17

Streszczenie

Oxidative stress plays an important role in the etiopathogenesis of acquired vitiligo. In patients with this disorder, impaied performance of the antioxidant system leads to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in their skin. Under physiological conditions, they play the role of mediators and regulators of many cellular processes. Their excess, however, leads to the destruction of structural and functional elements of dye cells. Previous studies clearly indicate the share of free radicals in the progression of lesions. The use of antioxidant defense elements, including antioxidants, may prove to be an important element of effective therapy of this disease.

Streszczenie

Oxidative stress plays an important role in the etiopathogenesis of acquired vitiligo. In patients with this disorder, impaied performance of the antioxidant system leads to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in their skin. Under physiological conditions, they play the role of mediators and regulators of many cellular processes. Their excess, however, leads to the destruction of structural and functional elements of dye cells. Previous studies clearly indicate the share of free radicals in the progression of lesions. The use of antioxidant defense elements, including antioxidants, may prove to be an important element of effective therapy of this disease.

Pobierz cytowanie

Słowa kluczowe

stres oksydacyjny, równowaga oksydacyjno-antyoksydacyjna, wolne rodniki tlenowe, bielactwo nabyte, etiopatogeneza bielactwa

Informacje o artykule
Tytuł

Rola równowagi oksydacyjno-antyoksydacyjnej w etiopatogenezie bielactwa nabytego

Czasopismo

Forum Dermatologicum

Numer

Tom 4, Nr 2 (2018)

Strony

63-69

Data publikacji on-line

2018-08-17

Rekord bibliograficzny

Forum Dermatologicum 2018;4(2):63-69.

Słowa kluczowe

stres oksydacyjny
równowaga oksydacyjno-antyoksydacyjna
wolne rodniki tlenowe
bielactwo nabyte
etiopatogeneza bielactwa

Autorzy

Laura Nowowiejska
Anna Niezgoda
Aleksandra Grzanka
Rafał Czajkowski
Czanita Cieścińska
Alina Woźniak
Karolina Szewczyk-Golec

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