open access

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)
Original article
Submitted: 2022-01-10
Accepted: 2022-02-07
Published online: 2022-03-22
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Assessment of morphological changes degree on the articular surfaces of the temporomandibular joints on the historical skeleton material

A. Stangret1, I. Teul1
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2022.0029
·
Pubmed: 35347696
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(2):487-492.
Affiliations
  1. Chair and Department of Normal Anatomy, Pomeranian Medical University, Szczecin, Poland

open access

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2022-01-10
Accepted: 2022-02-07
Published online: 2022-03-22

Abstract

Background: The aging process in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) is related, more or less, with degenerative processes. Despite the rich literature on morphology and anatomy and the functioning of the components of the TMJs, there is much less research studies on the anatomy and diseases of these joints on historical populations. The aim of the study was to analyse the frequency and intensity of morphological and dysfunctional changes within the TMJ.
Materials and methods: The research material included skeleton material from three chronologically and geographically diverse archaeological series located in Poland in the cities: Strzelce Krajenskie (n = 86), Santok (n = 86) and Wroclaw (‘Kuronia’ collection) (n = 70). The examination of the skeletal material was based on the macroscopic analysis of the articular surfaces of the TMJ.
Results and Conclusions: The difference in the frequency of degenerative changes observed on the articular surfaces of the TMJs between the examined skeletal series from selected cities was insignificant (Santok: 81.4%, Strzelce Krajenskie: 72.1%, ‘Kuronia’: 68.6%). However, the obtained results showed a difference in the intensity of changes in the TMJ between individuals representing the early medieval population from Santok and individuals from the beginning of the 20th century collection ‘Kuronia’.

Abstract

Background: The aging process in the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) is related, more or less, with degenerative processes. Despite the rich literature on morphology and anatomy and the functioning of the components of the TMJs, there is much less research studies on the anatomy and diseases of these joints on historical populations. The aim of the study was to analyse the frequency and intensity of morphological and dysfunctional changes within the TMJ.
Materials and methods: The research material included skeleton material from three chronologically and geographically diverse archaeological series located in Poland in the cities: Strzelce Krajenskie (n = 86), Santok (n = 86) and Wroclaw (‘Kuronia’ collection) (n = 70). The examination of the skeletal material was based on the macroscopic analysis of the articular surfaces of the TMJ.
Results and Conclusions: The difference in the frequency of degenerative changes observed on the articular surfaces of the TMJs between the examined skeletal series from selected cities was insignificant (Santok: 81.4%, Strzelce Krajenskie: 72.1%, ‘Kuronia’: 68.6%). However, the obtained results showed a difference in the intensity of changes in the TMJ between individuals representing the early medieval population from Santok and individuals from the beginning of the 20th century collection ‘Kuronia’.

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Keywords

temporomandibular joints, degenerative changes in joints, temporomandibular disorders, determinant of physiological stress

About this article
Title

Assessment of morphological changes degree on the articular surfaces of the temporomandibular joints on the historical skeleton material

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

487-492

Published online

2022-03-22

Page views

873

Article views/downloads

150

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0029

Pubmed

35347696

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(2):487-492.

Keywords

temporomandibular joints
degenerative changes in joints
temporomandibular disorders
determinant of physiological stress

Authors

A. Stangret
I. Teul

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