open access

Ahead of Print
Review article
Submitted: 2021-04-09
Accepted: 2021-07-09
Published online: 2021-10-28
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The posterior cranial fossa's dura mater innervation and its clinical implication in headache: a comprehensive review

D. Hage1, M. Mathkour1, J. Iwanaga12, A. S. Dumont1, R. S. Tubbs12345
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0114
·
Pubmed: 34730227
Affiliations
  1. Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane Center for Clinical Neurosciences, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA
  2. Department of Neurology, Tulane Center for Clinical Neurosciences, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA
  3. Department of Structural & Cellular Biology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA
  4. Department of Neurosurgery and Ochsner Neuroscience Institute, Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, LA, USA
  5. Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George’s University, St. George’s, Grenada

open access

Ahead of Print
REVIEW ARTICLES
Submitted: 2021-04-09
Accepted: 2021-07-09
Published online: 2021-10-28

Abstract

The pathophysiology of migraines and headaches has been a point of interest in research as they affect a large subset of the population, and the exact mechanism is still unclear. There is evidence implicating the dura mater and its innervation as contributing factors, especially at the posterior cranial fossa. Many modes of innervation have been identified, including the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), superior cervical ganglion, vagus nerve, trigeminal nerve, hypoglossal nerve, and glossopharyngeal nerve. While the exact method of innervation is still under investigation, there is strong evidence suggesting that different types of headaches (migraine vs. occipital vs. cervicogenic) are due to specific nerves and inflammatory mediators that contribute to the dura mater in some way. By understanding how these innervation patterns manifest clinically, the course of treatment can be tailored based on the physiological etiology. Here, we present a comprehensive literature review of the current research regarding the innervation of the dura mater of the posterior cranial fossa and its clinical implications.

Abstract

The pathophysiology of migraines and headaches has been a point of interest in research as they affect a large subset of the population, and the exact mechanism is still unclear. There is evidence implicating the dura mater and its innervation as contributing factors, especially at the posterior cranial fossa. Many modes of innervation have been identified, including the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), superior cervical ganglion, vagus nerve, trigeminal nerve, hypoglossal nerve, and glossopharyngeal nerve. While the exact method of innervation is still under investigation, there is strong evidence suggesting that different types of headaches (migraine vs. occipital vs. cervicogenic) are due to specific nerves and inflammatory mediators that contribute to the dura mater in some way. By understanding how these innervation patterns manifest clinically, the course of treatment can be tailored based on the physiological etiology. Here, we present a comprehensive literature review of the current research regarding the innervation of the dura mater of the posterior cranial fossa and its clinical implications.

Get Citation

Keywords

anatomy, nerves, cranium, meninges, headache

About this article
Title

The posterior cranial fossa's dura mater innervation and its clinical implication in headache: a comprehensive review

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Review article

Published online

2021-10-28

Page views

539

Article views/downloads

334

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0114

Pubmed

34730227

Keywords

anatomy
nerves
cranium
meninges
headache

Authors

D. Hage
M. Mathkour
J. Iwanaga
A. S. Dumont
R. S. Tubbs

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