open access

Vol 81, No 3 (2022)
Original article
Submitted: 2021-01-08
Accepted: 2021-07-01
Published online: 2021-08-03
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Anatomical study of the anterior interosseous nerve

A. Jeon1, M. Lee2, D. W. Kim3, O.-Y. Kwon3, J.-H. Lee4
·
Pubmed: 34355783
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(3):574-578.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomy/Catholic Institute for Applied Anatomy, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
  2. School of Music and Arts, College of Music and Arts, Dankook University, Jukjeon, Korea
  3. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, Korea
  4. Anatomy Laboratory, College of Sports Science, Korea National Sport University, Seoul, Korea

open access

Vol 81, No 3 (2022)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2021-01-08
Accepted: 2021-07-01
Published online: 2021-08-03

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the location of nerves that innervate the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) and the pronator quadratus muscles. It also investigates the change in nerve location with hand movement.
Materials and methods: We studied 30 adult cadavers (17 males and 13 females) with a mean age of 69.5 years (range: 60–95 years). The reference line was from the humeral epicondylar line to the styloid process line of both the radius and ulnar bones. This study measured the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) branch outpoint and the innervated muscle nerve entry point to the muscle belly. It also examines nerve position changes as related to making a fist.
Results: The reference line mean distance was 24.1 ± 1.2 cm. The median nerve branched into the AIN at 18.0 ± 4.0%. We found the most densely distributed section of the nerves’ entry point to the muscle belly to be at a distance of 30% to 40% for the FDP and from 30% to 40% for the FPL. Except for the FPL, the nerve branch outpoints and the FDP moved by 3.0%, depending upon hand movements.
Conclusions: The results of this study show that it will be necessary to consider the anatomy of the nerve location as it enters the muscle belly as well as how it changes with movement.

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the location of nerves that innervate the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) and the pronator quadratus muscles. It also investigates the change in nerve location with hand movement.
Materials and methods: We studied 30 adult cadavers (17 males and 13 females) with a mean age of 69.5 years (range: 60–95 years). The reference line was from the humeral epicondylar line to the styloid process line of both the radius and ulnar bones. This study measured the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) branch outpoint and the innervated muscle nerve entry point to the muscle belly. It also examines nerve position changes as related to making a fist.
Results: The reference line mean distance was 24.1 ± 1.2 cm. The median nerve branched into the AIN at 18.0 ± 4.0%. We found the most densely distributed section of the nerves’ entry point to the muscle belly to be at a distance of 30% to 40% for the FDP and from 30% to 40% for the FPL. Except for the FPL, the nerve branch outpoints and the FDP moved by 3.0%, depending upon hand movements.
Conclusions: The results of this study show that it will be necessary to consider the anatomy of the nerve location as it enters the muscle belly as well as how it changes with movement.

Get Citation

Keywords

anterior interosseous nerve, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor pollicis longus, pronator quadratus, nerve position change

About this article
Title

Anatomical study of the anterior interosseous nerve

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 3 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

574-578

Published online

2021-08-03

Page views

4714

Article views/downloads

1240

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0078

Pubmed

34355783

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(3):574-578.

Keywords

anterior interosseous nerve
flexor digitorum profundus
flexor pollicis longus
pronator quadratus
nerve position change

Authors

A. Jeon
M. Lee
D. W. Kim
O.-Y. Kwon
J.-H. Lee

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