open access

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)
Original article
Submitted: 2021-03-01
Accepted: 2021-04-22
Published online: 2021-05-06
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Histological analysis of spermatogenesis and the germ cell seasonal development within the testis of domesticated tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis)

J. Tang12, G. He13, Y. Yang1, Q. Li1, Y. He1, C. Yu1, L. Luo1
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0048
·
Pubmed: 33997948
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(2):412-420.
Affiliations
  1. School of Basic Medical Sciences, Kunming Medical University, Kunming, China
  2. Department of Medical Genetics and Prenatal Diagnosis, Kunming Maternity and Child Health Hospital, Kunming, China
  3. Clinical Laboratory, Yunnan Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital, Kunming, China

open access

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2021-03-01
Accepted: 2021-04-22
Published online: 2021-05-06

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to address the lack of information on the male germ cell seasonal development of domesticated tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis).
Materials and methods: Testicular tissues were collected from 60 tree shrews (n = 5 per month). The ultrastructures of the testes and spermatids were examined via transmission electron microscopy. Apoptosis of spermatogenic cells was measured through terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) staining. The expression of proliferation factors, namely, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki67, in testicular tissues was assayed through
immunohistochemistry.
Results: Spermatid ultrastructure showed seasonal differences, and spermatogenesis was relatively active in June and July and relatively stagnant from October to November. The percentage of TUNEL-positive germ cells was less during October and November, while greater in July than other phases. The number of PCNA-nucleus-positive germ cells was most in June and July, but with cytoplasm staining from October to November. Ki67 presented positive expression in the testes from April to September, with highest expression in June, but with no expression from October to March.
Conclusions: In summary, there are seasonal differences in tissue morphology related to spermatogenesis in domesticated tree shrews. PCNA expression and Ki67 expression are good indicators of seasonal differences in male germ cells.

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to address the lack of information on the male germ cell seasonal development of domesticated tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis).
Materials and methods: Testicular tissues were collected from 60 tree shrews (n = 5 per month). The ultrastructures of the testes and spermatids were examined via transmission electron microscopy. Apoptosis of spermatogenic cells was measured through terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) staining. The expression of proliferation factors, namely, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki67, in testicular tissues was assayed through
immunohistochemistry.
Results: Spermatid ultrastructure showed seasonal differences, and spermatogenesis was relatively active in June and July and relatively stagnant from October to November. The percentage of TUNEL-positive germ cells was less during October and November, while greater in July than other phases. The number of PCNA-nucleus-positive germ cells was most in June and July, but with cytoplasm staining from October to November. Ki67 presented positive expression in the testes from April to September, with highest expression in June, but with no expression from October to March.
Conclusions: In summary, there are seasonal differences in tissue morphology related to spermatogenesis in domesticated tree shrews. PCNA expression and Ki67 expression are good indicators of seasonal differences in male germ cells.

Get Citation

Keywords

tree shrew, spermatogenic cell, seasonal differences, testis

About this article
Title

Histological analysis of spermatogenesis and the germ cell seasonal development within the testis of domesticated tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis)

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

412-420

Published online

2021-05-06

Page views

1268

Article views/downloads

487

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0048

Pubmed

33997948

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(2):412-420.

Keywords

tree shrew
spermatogenic cell
seasonal differences
testis

Authors

J. Tang
G. He
Y. Yang
Q. Li
Y. He
C. Yu
L. Luo

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