open access

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)
Original article
Submitted: 2021-03-12
Accepted: 2021-04-19
Published online: 2021-04-29
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Relationship between mandibular symphysis dimensions and skeletal pattern in adults

H.Y.A. Marghalani1, G. Guan2, P. Hyun3, S. Tabbaa4, A. I. Linjawi1, T. Al-Jewair5
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0045
·
Pubmed: 33954960
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(2):464-471.
Affiliations
  1. Orthodontic Department, Faculty of Dentistry King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
  2. Department of Orthodontics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States
  3. Private Practice, Albany, NY, United States
  4. School of Orthodontics, Jacksonville University, United States
  5. Department of Orthodontics, School of Dental Medicine, University of Buffalo, NY, United States

open access

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2021-03-12
Accepted: 2021-04-19
Published online: 2021-04-29

Abstract

Background: The knowledge of dimensions of the symphysis is important for morphological and orthodontic studies. This research evaluates the association between mandibular symphysis dimensions and anteroposterior and vertical
skeletal patterns in adults.
Materials and methods: This cross-sectional cephalometric study included 90 lateral cephalograms of untreated subjects presenting for orthodontic treatment. The inclusion criteria were adults with lateral cephalograms showing the symphyseal region and anterior cranial base. One investigator traced and analysed all cephalograms. Symphyseal height, thickness, and ratio between height and thickness were measured in relation to seven anteroposterior and vertical skeletal measurements in females and males.
Results: Symphyseal measurements were associated with SNAo (anteroposterior) in females and Gonial angle (vertical) in males. When analysed by anteroposterior skeletal classification (ANBo), no significant differences in symphyseal dimensions were found. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that Gonion-Nerve (mm) and Gonial angle were significantly associated with symphyseal height. Gonion-Nerve (mm), basal bone width (mm), and alveolar bone height (mm) were associated with symphyseal thickness. Basal bone width (mm) and alveolar bone height (mm) were associated with symphyseal ratio.
Conclusions: Symphyseal dimensions were significantly associated with vertical but not anteroposterior skeletal patterns. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the Gonion-Nerve measurements concerning the symphysis in relation to vertical and anteroposterior skeletal patterns.

Abstract

Background: The knowledge of dimensions of the symphysis is important for morphological and orthodontic studies. This research evaluates the association between mandibular symphysis dimensions and anteroposterior and vertical
skeletal patterns in adults.
Materials and methods: This cross-sectional cephalometric study included 90 lateral cephalograms of untreated subjects presenting for orthodontic treatment. The inclusion criteria were adults with lateral cephalograms showing the symphyseal region and anterior cranial base. One investigator traced and analysed all cephalograms. Symphyseal height, thickness, and ratio between height and thickness were measured in relation to seven anteroposterior and vertical skeletal measurements in females and males.
Results: Symphyseal measurements were associated with SNAo (anteroposterior) in females and Gonial angle (vertical) in males. When analysed by anteroposterior skeletal classification (ANBo), no significant differences in symphyseal dimensions were found. Multiple linear regression analyses showed that Gonion-Nerve (mm) and Gonial angle were significantly associated with symphyseal height. Gonion-Nerve (mm), basal bone width (mm), and alveolar bone height (mm) were associated with symphyseal thickness. Basal bone width (mm) and alveolar bone height (mm) were associated with symphyseal ratio.
Conclusions: Symphyseal dimensions were significantly associated with vertical but not anteroposterior skeletal patterns. Future studies are warranted to evaluate the Gonion-Nerve measurements concerning the symphysis in relation to vertical and anteroposterior skeletal patterns.

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Keywords

mandible, skeletal patterns, dimensions, symphysis

About this article
Title

Relationship between mandibular symphysis dimensions and skeletal pattern in adults

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

464-471

Published online

2021-04-29

Page views

1377

Article views/downloads

717

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0045

Pubmed

33954960

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(2):464-471.

Keywords

mandible
skeletal patterns
dimensions
symphysis

Authors

H.Y.A. Marghalani
G. Guan
P. Hyun
S. Tabbaa
A. I. Linjawi
T. Al-Jewair

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