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Original article
Submitted: 2021-01-25
Accepted: 2021-03-11
Published online: 2021-04-13
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Morphological variability of the fibularis tertius tendon in human fetuses

P. Karauda1, F. Paulsen23, M. Polguj4, R. Diogo5, Ł. Olewnik1
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0039
·
Pubmed: 33899207
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomical Dissection and Donation, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  2. Institute of Functional and Clinical Anatomy, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
  3. Department of Topographic Anatomy and Operative Surgery, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia
  4. Department of Normal and Clinical Anatomy, Chair of Anatomy and Histology, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  5. Department of Anatomy, Howard University, Washington, DC, United States

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2021-01-25
Accepted: 2021-03-11
Published online: 2021-04-13

Abstract

Background: In adults, the fibularis tertius (FT) demonstrates great morphological variation. The present study classifies the types of FT insertion in human fetuses and compares their prevalence to the prevailing classification among adults.

Materials and methods: Fifty spontaneously-aborted human fetuses (19 male, 31 female, 100 upper limbs in total) aged 18-38 weeks of gestation at death were examined. The fetuses were obtained from spontaneous abortion after parental consent. The study was performed in accordance with the legal procedures in force in Poland and with the Donation Corpse program for both adults and fetuses.

Results: The most common type of FT found was Type VI (32%), characterized by a bifurcated distal attachment: a main tendon inserting onto the base of the fourth metatarsal bone, and accessory bands inserting onto the fourth interosseous space. Five other types were observed: Type IV (20%), with a single tendon inserting distally to the fascia covering the fourth interosseous space; Type I (18%), with a single tendon inserting distally onto the shaft of the fifth metatarsal bone; Type V (14%), with a bifurcated arrangement comprising a main tendon characterized by a very wide insertion onto the base of the fifth metatarsal bone and an accessory band inserting onto the base of the fourth metatarsal bone; and Type III (12%) with a single tendon inserting distally onto the shaft of the fourth metatarsal bone and fascia covering the fourth interosseous space. Finally, Type II (4%) was characterized by a single tendon inserting onto the base of the fifth metatarsal bone via a very wide distal insertion.

Conclusions: The fibularis tertius demonstrates high morphological variability, with the most common configuration found in adults — a single insertion onto metatarsal 5 — being actually uncommonly found in fetuses.

Abstract

Background: In adults, the fibularis tertius (FT) demonstrates great morphological variation. The present study classifies the types of FT insertion in human fetuses and compares their prevalence to the prevailing classification among adults.

Materials and methods: Fifty spontaneously-aborted human fetuses (19 male, 31 female, 100 upper limbs in total) aged 18-38 weeks of gestation at death were examined. The fetuses were obtained from spontaneous abortion after parental consent. The study was performed in accordance with the legal procedures in force in Poland and with the Donation Corpse program for both adults and fetuses.

Results: The most common type of FT found was Type VI (32%), characterized by a bifurcated distal attachment: a main tendon inserting onto the base of the fourth metatarsal bone, and accessory bands inserting onto the fourth interosseous space. Five other types were observed: Type IV (20%), with a single tendon inserting distally to the fascia covering the fourth interosseous space; Type I (18%), with a single tendon inserting distally onto the shaft of the fifth metatarsal bone; Type V (14%), with a bifurcated arrangement comprising a main tendon characterized by a very wide insertion onto the base of the fifth metatarsal bone and an accessory band inserting onto the base of the fourth metatarsal bone; and Type III (12%) with a single tendon inserting distally onto the shaft of the fourth metatarsal bone and fascia covering the fourth interosseous space. Finally, Type II (4%) was characterized by a single tendon inserting onto the base of the fifth metatarsal bone via a very wide distal insertion.

Conclusions: The fibularis tertius demonstrates high morphological variability, with the most common configuration found in adults — a single insertion onto metatarsal 5 — being actually uncommonly found in fetuses.

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Keywords

fibularis tertius, fibularis tertius tendon, anatomical variations, new classification, fetuses, variations, development

About this article
Title

Morphological variability of the fibularis tertius tendon in human fetuses

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Original article

Published online

2021-04-13

Page views

582

Article views/downloads

305

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0039

Pubmed

33899207

Keywords

fibularis tertius
fibularis tertius tendon
anatomical variations
new classification
fetuses
variations
development

Authors

P. Karauda
F. Paulsen
M. Polguj
R. Diogo
Ł. Olewnik

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