open access

Ahead of Print
Original article
Published online: 2021-04-13
Submitted: 2020-12-19
Accepted: 2021-03-11
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Arterial hypertension and remodeling of the right ventricle

A. Kosiński, G. M. Piwko, R. Kamiński, E. Nowicka, A. Kaczyńska, M. Zajączkowski, K. Czerwiec, M. Gleinert-Rożek, K. Karnecki, T. Gos
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0038
·
Pubmed: 33899208

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2021-04-13
Submitted: 2020-12-19
Accepted: 2021-03-11

Abstract

Background: In case of long-term and physiological loads (e.g. during pregnancy or regular athletics training), reversible morphological changes occur in the heart - cardiomyocytes undergo hypertrophy, however, this is not accompanied by impairment of left ventricular function or myocyte metabolism. However, in the course of various pathological processes, as time goes by, gradually permanent morphological changes occur. These changes are referred to as remodeling of the heart muscle, which, regardless of the primary cause, can lead to the development of chronic heart failure. Materials and methods: The study was performed on post-mortem material of 35 human hearts obtained from forensic sections and anatomopathological sections of people who died of non-cardiac causes (mainly traffic accidents, suicide attempts, strokes, acute infections); material was fixed in a 4% formalin solution. The hearts were subjected to macro- and microscopic assessment. During microscopic assessment the features of remodeling were evaluated. Results and conclusions: In vivo and echocardiographic tests, as well as macroscopic evaluation of post-mortem material, suggest the presence of some kind of right ventricular muscle remodeling, however classic microscopic observations, presented in this study do not provide such unambiguous evidence. Thus, the question arises: why and how the right ventricular function is disturbed, sometimes at early stages of arterial hypertension.

Abstract

Background: In case of long-term and physiological loads (e.g. during pregnancy or regular athletics training), reversible morphological changes occur in the heart - cardiomyocytes undergo hypertrophy, however, this is not accompanied by impairment of left ventricular function or myocyte metabolism. However, in the course of various pathological processes, as time goes by, gradually permanent morphological changes occur. These changes are referred to as remodeling of the heart muscle, which, regardless of the primary cause, can lead to the development of chronic heart failure. Materials and methods: The study was performed on post-mortem material of 35 human hearts obtained from forensic sections and anatomopathological sections of people who died of non-cardiac causes (mainly traffic accidents, suicide attempts, strokes, acute infections); material was fixed in a 4% formalin solution. The hearts were subjected to macro- and microscopic assessment. During microscopic assessment the features of remodeling were evaluated. Results and conclusions: In vivo and echocardiographic tests, as well as macroscopic evaluation of post-mortem material, suggest the presence of some kind of right ventricular muscle remodeling, however classic microscopic observations, presented in this study do not provide such unambiguous evidence. Thus, the question arises: why and how the right ventricular function is disturbed, sometimes at early stages of arterial hypertension.

Get Citation

Keywords

heart, human, changes, hypertensive

About this article
Title

Arterial hypertension and remodeling of the right ventricle

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Original article

Published online

2021-04-13

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0038

Pubmed

33899208

Keywords

heart
human
changes
hypertensive

Authors

A. Kosiński
G. M. Piwko
R. Kamiński
E. Nowicka
A. Kaczyńska
M. Zajączkowski
K. Czerwiec
M. Gleinert-Rożek
K. Karnecki
T. Gos

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