open access

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)
Original article
Submitted: 2020-12-24
Accepted: 2021-02-01
Published online: 2021-02-23
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Identification of hepatosensitive region and their neural connections in the hippocampus of rats

Z. Cheng12, R. Wei3, N. Cao1, Z. Li1, M. Li1, M. Liu4, L. Zhu4, C. Xia1
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0020
·
Pubmed: 33634834
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(2):261-270.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Human Anatomy, Basic Medical College of Guilin Medical University, China
  2. Department of Anatomy, Basic Medical Department of Henan Vocational College of Nursing, China
  3. College of Biotechnology, Guilin Medical University, China
  4. Affiliated Hospital of Guilin Medical University, China

open access

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2020-12-24
Accepted: 2021-02-01
Published online: 2021-02-23

Abstract

Background: Visceral function localisation of the brain is very complex. For many years, people have been actively exploring the neural mechanism regulating visceral and substance metabolism, clarifying the complex relationship between the brain and peripheral nervous system related to the regulation of visceral activity, and analysing its complex neural pathways. The brain is the advanced centre of visceral function regulation. As an advanced centre for substance metabolism and visceral regulation, the hippocampus is crucial for regulating visceral function. The liver is the core organ of material metabolism, and its afferent signals are mainly projected to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) through vagus nerve, and then they are projected to the hypothalamus and limbic system.
Materials and methods: We placed a stereotaxic instrument on the head of each rat and performed craniotomy to open a window above the left hippocampus. We used gold-plated tungsten electrodes to monitor hippocampal neuronal discharges. Grounding was achieved using screws and silver wire. We electrically stimulated the liver branch of the vagus nerve and observed changes in hippocampal neuron discharges using a biological method; in this way, we identified hepatosensitive hippocampal region. We injected FluoroGold into this region and related brain areas. After 3 days, the rats were sacrificed and perfused; the hippocampi were fixed, dehydated, frozen, sectioned, and subjected to fluorescence microscopy.
Results: Nerve discharge frequency and amplitude significantly increased in the hippocampal CA3 region (AP: –4.9, ML: –5.1, DV: –5.0 mm). After FluoroGold was injected into the left hepatosensitive region in the hippocampus, labelled cells were found in the contralateral hippocampus, ipsilateral piriform cortex (PC), locus coeruleus (LC) and bilateral lateral hypothalamus (LHA); fluorescence in the ipsilateral hypothalamus was stronger than that of the contralateral hypothalamus. FluoroGold was injected into the LHA, PC, and LC; no labelled cells were found in the hippocampal CA3 region or in the control group.
Conclusions: The hippocampal CA3 area of rats may contain a hepatosensitive region that plays important roles in the regulation of liver and other organ function. This region may receive input from the LHA, PC, and LC.

Abstract

Background: Visceral function localisation of the brain is very complex. For many years, people have been actively exploring the neural mechanism regulating visceral and substance metabolism, clarifying the complex relationship between the brain and peripheral nervous system related to the regulation of visceral activity, and analysing its complex neural pathways. The brain is the advanced centre of visceral function regulation. As an advanced centre for substance metabolism and visceral regulation, the hippocampus is crucial for regulating visceral function. The liver is the core organ of material metabolism, and its afferent signals are mainly projected to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) through vagus nerve, and then they are projected to the hypothalamus and limbic system.
Materials and methods: We placed a stereotaxic instrument on the head of each rat and performed craniotomy to open a window above the left hippocampus. We used gold-plated tungsten electrodes to monitor hippocampal neuronal discharges. Grounding was achieved using screws and silver wire. We electrically stimulated the liver branch of the vagus nerve and observed changes in hippocampal neuron discharges using a biological method; in this way, we identified hepatosensitive hippocampal region. We injected FluoroGold into this region and related brain areas. After 3 days, the rats were sacrificed and perfused; the hippocampi were fixed, dehydated, frozen, sectioned, and subjected to fluorescence microscopy.
Results: Nerve discharge frequency and amplitude significantly increased in the hippocampal CA3 region (AP: –4.9, ML: –5.1, DV: –5.0 mm). After FluoroGold was injected into the left hepatosensitive region in the hippocampus, labelled cells were found in the contralateral hippocampus, ipsilateral piriform cortex (PC), locus coeruleus (LC) and bilateral lateral hypothalamus (LHA); fluorescence in the ipsilateral hypothalamus was stronger than that of the contralateral hypothalamus. FluoroGold was injected into the LHA, PC, and LC; no labelled cells were found in the hippocampal CA3 region or in the control group.
Conclusions: The hippocampal CA3 area of rats may contain a hepatosensitive region that plays important roles in the regulation of liver and other organ function. This region may receive input from the LHA, PC, and LC.

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Keywords

neural regulation of liver function, hepatic branch of the vagus nerve, hippocampus, neural pathways

About this article
Title

Identification of hepatosensitive region and their neural connections in the hippocampus of rats

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 2 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

261-270

Published online

2021-02-23

Page views

1177

Article views/downloads

644

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0020

Pubmed

33634834

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(2):261-270.

Keywords

neural regulation of liver function
hepatic branch of the vagus nerve
hippocampus
neural pathways

Authors

Z. Cheng
R. Wei
N. Cao
Z. Li
M. Li
M. Liu
L. Zhu
C. Xia

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