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Ahead of Print
Original article
Published online: 2021-01-22
Submitted: 2020-09-14
Accepted: 2020-12-21
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Bone dehiscences of medial orbital wall on CT and assessment of terminological errors in literature

M. Kaya, F. Cankal, I. Tekdemir
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0004
·
Pubmed: 33511625

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2021-01-22
Submitted: 2020-09-14
Accepted: 2020-12-21

Abstract

Background: The objective of this study is to investigate the position and frequency of dehiscences in the medial orbital wall and to reveal that dehiscences and orbital adipose tissue hernias are distinct entities. Materials and methods: Two hundred-thirty medial orbital walls of 115 patients with a preliminary diagnosis of headache and sinusitis but without active ethmoidal sinusitis were examined by computer tomography in the axial plane.  Two separate radiologists assessed continuity of the medial orbital  wall and orbital fat tissue herniation in ethmoid cells. The medial orbital wall was divided into four quadrants and the dehiscence distribution was evaluated. Results: Bone defects  were detected in 71 patients (30.9%) in 230 orbital medial wall reviews of 115 patients (59 males, 56 females).  Eight of these cases (4 male, 4 female) (3.5%) had herniation of the orbital adipose tissue into the ethmoid sinus. Of the 108 dehiscences, 47 were localized in the posterior upper quadrant. A statistically significant difference was found in the dehiscence distribution according to the quadrants. No significant relationship was found among age, gender, side of dehiscence and frequency of dehiscence. Conclusions: Dehiscences in the posterior upper quadrant are more common  in the medial orbital wall. Although bone dehiscences in the medial  orbital wall and the herniation of the orbital fat tissue are two different entities, they are used interchangeably in most of the literature and in radiological reporting.

Abstract

Background: The objective of this study is to investigate the position and frequency of dehiscences in the medial orbital wall and to reveal that dehiscences and orbital adipose tissue hernias are distinct entities. Materials and methods: Two hundred-thirty medial orbital walls of 115 patients with a preliminary diagnosis of headache and sinusitis but without active ethmoidal sinusitis were examined by computer tomography in the axial plane.  Two separate radiologists assessed continuity of the medial orbital  wall and orbital fat tissue herniation in ethmoid cells. The medial orbital wall was divided into four quadrants and the dehiscence distribution was evaluated. Results: Bone defects  were detected in 71 patients (30.9%) in 230 orbital medial wall reviews of 115 patients (59 males, 56 females).  Eight of these cases (4 male, 4 female) (3.5%) had herniation of the orbital adipose tissue into the ethmoid sinus. Of the 108 dehiscences, 47 were localized in the posterior upper quadrant. A statistically significant difference was found in the dehiscence distribution according to the quadrants. No significant relationship was found among age, gender, side of dehiscence and frequency of dehiscence. Conclusions: Dehiscences in the posterior upper quadrant are more common  in the medial orbital wall. Although bone dehiscences in the medial  orbital wall and the herniation of the orbital fat tissue are two different entities, they are used interchangeably in most of the literature and in radiological reporting.

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Keywords

dehiscence, herniation, medial orbital wall, CT

About this article
Title

Bone dehiscences of medial orbital wall on CT and assessment of terminological errors in literature

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Original article

Published online

2021-01-22

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0004

Pubmed

33511625

Keywords

dehiscence
herniation
medial orbital wall
CT

Authors

M. Kaya
F. Cankal
I. Tekdemir

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