open access

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)
Case report
Submitted: 2020-11-27
Accepted: 2020-12-30
Published online: 2021-01-22
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Transantral intraseptal sinuous canal

M. C. Rusu1, C. Bichir1, A. D. Vrapciu1
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2021.0001
·
Pubmed: 33511628
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(1):234-236.
Affiliations
  1. Division of Anatomy, Faculty of Dental Medicine, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania

open access

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2020-11-27
Accepted: 2020-12-30
Published online: 2021-01-22

Abstract

The sinuous canal is an anatomically well-defined intramural canal of the maxillary sinus (MS) folded within the antral walls. Commonly, its first, infraorbital part, courses within the antral roof, while its second, transverse facial part courses below the infraorbital foramen within the anterior antral wall. While retrospective files of patients that were scanned in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for different dental medical purposes were observed randomly, a peculiar variant of the sinuous canal was noticed and further documented. The respective canal origin was far posterior in the infraorbital groove and the canal coursed through the MS embedded within an incomplete oblique septum dividing the antrum into anterosuperior and posteroinferior chambers. Then the sinuous canal continued with the transverse facial segment. As the sinuous canal contains the superior anterior alveolar nerve and artery, major suppliers of the frontal teeth, it is recommended to document in CBCT a possible transantral, and not intramural, course of it, especially when surgical or endoscopic corridors through the MS are planned.

Abstract

The sinuous canal is an anatomically well-defined intramural canal of the maxillary sinus (MS) folded within the antral walls. Commonly, its first, infraorbital part, courses within the antral roof, while its second, transverse facial part courses below the infraorbital foramen within the anterior antral wall. While retrospective files of patients that were scanned in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for different dental medical purposes were observed randomly, a peculiar variant of the sinuous canal was noticed and further documented. The respective canal origin was far posterior in the infraorbital groove and the canal coursed through the MS embedded within an incomplete oblique septum dividing the antrum into anterosuperior and posteroinferior chambers. Then the sinuous canal continued with the transverse facial segment. As the sinuous canal contains the superior anterior alveolar nerve and artery, major suppliers of the frontal teeth, it is recommended to document in CBCT a possible transantral, and not intramural, course of it, especially when surgical or endoscopic corridors through the MS are planned.

Get Citation

Keywords

superior anterior alveolar nerve, infraorbital nerve, infraorbital canal, maxillary sinus

About this article
Title

Transantral intraseptal sinuous canal

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)

Article type

Case report

Pages

234-236

Published online

2021-01-22

Page views

1155

Article views/downloads

741

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0001

Pubmed

33511628

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(1):234-236.

Keywords

superior anterior alveolar nerve
infraorbital nerve
infraorbital canal
maxillary sinus

Authors

M. C. Rusu
C. Bichir
A. D. Vrapciu

References (13)
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  10. Rusu MC, Sava CJ, Ilie AC, et al. Agger nasi cells versus lacrimal cells and uncinate bullae in cone-beam computed tomography. Ear Nose Throat J. 2019; 98(6): 334–339.
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