open access

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)
Original article
Submitted: 2020-07-07
Accepted: 2020-11-09
Published online: 2020-12-30
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The influence of the morphometric parameters of the intercondylar notch on occurrence of meniscofemoral ligaments

M. Minic1, I. Zivanovic-Macuzic1, M. Jakovcevski1, M. Kovacevic1, S. Minic2, D. Jeremic1
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2020.0151
·
Pubmed: 33438187
·
Folia Morphol 2022;81(1):190-195.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Serbia
  2. College of Applied Health Sciences, Ćuprija, Serbia

open access

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2020-07-07
Accepted: 2020-11-09
Published online: 2020-12-30

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the existence of correlation between the morphometric parameters of the intercondylar notch of the femur and the occurrence of meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs) and if there is any relationship in the running angle (RA) value between narrowed and normal sized intercondylar notch.
Materials and methods: Coronal, sagittal and horizontal magnetic resonance (MR) images of 90 patients with specified exclusion criteria were included in this study. The c2 test was used for statistical analysis. In our research either one or both MFLs were identified in 70 (77.8%) of the 90 coronal MR images. In normal sized intercondylar notch, MFLs was seen in 39 (43.3%) cases and on 31 (34.4%) MR images with narrowed intercondylar notch.
Results: A significant correlation was established between the occurrence of the MFL and morphometric parameters of the intercondylar notch (p < 0.05). In normal sized intercondylar notch, 12 posterior meniscofemoral ligaments (pMFLs) of type I were detected (RA value 42°), 8 of type II (RA value 33°), 5 of type III (RA value 23°) and two were of indeterminate type, whilst 10 anterior meniscofemoral ligaments (aMFLs) were of type I (RA value 39°), 7 of type II (RA value 31°), 2 of type III (RA value 25°) and the remaining 6 were indeterminate. In narrowed intercondylar notch, 10 ligaments of pMFLs were of type I (RA value 30°), 8 of type II (RA value 25°), 5 of type III (RA value 20°), 10 ligaments of aMFLs were of type I (RA value 35°) and 9 were indeterminate. Statistically significant differences in the value of the running angle of pMFL type I and of type II were evaluated between two groups with different shaped intercondylar notch (p < 0.05).
Conclusions: The results shown in our study may be useful in medical clinical practice, reconstructive surgery, interpretation of knee MR images as well as genetic research.

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the existence of correlation between the morphometric parameters of the intercondylar notch of the femur and the occurrence of meniscofemoral ligaments (MFLs) and if there is any relationship in the running angle (RA) value between narrowed and normal sized intercondylar notch.
Materials and methods: Coronal, sagittal and horizontal magnetic resonance (MR) images of 90 patients with specified exclusion criteria were included in this study. The c2 test was used for statistical analysis. In our research either one or both MFLs were identified in 70 (77.8%) of the 90 coronal MR images. In normal sized intercondylar notch, MFLs was seen in 39 (43.3%) cases and on 31 (34.4%) MR images with narrowed intercondylar notch.
Results: A significant correlation was established between the occurrence of the MFL and morphometric parameters of the intercondylar notch (p < 0.05). In normal sized intercondylar notch, 12 posterior meniscofemoral ligaments (pMFLs) of type I were detected (RA value 42°), 8 of type II (RA value 33°), 5 of type III (RA value 23°) and two were of indeterminate type, whilst 10 anterior meniscofemoral ligaments (aMFLs) were of type I (RA value 39°), 7 of type II (RA value 31°), 2 of type III (RA value 25°) and the remaining 6 were indeterminate. In narrowed intercondylar notch, 10 ligaments of pMFLs were of type I (RA value 30°), 8 of type II (RA value 25°), 5 of type III (RA value 20°), 10 ligaments of aMFLs were of type I (RA value 35°) and 9 were indeterminate. Statistically significant differences in the value of the running angle of pMFL type I and of type II were evaluated between two groups with different shaped intercondylar notch (p < 0.05).
Conclusions: The results shown in our study may be useful in medical clinical practice, reconstructive surgery, interpretation of knee MR images as well as genetic research.

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Keywords

intercondylar notch, meniscofemoral ligament, knee and magnetic resonance

About this article
Title

The influence of the morphometric parameters of the intercondylar notch on occurrence of meniscofemoral ligaments

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 81, No 1 (2022)

Article type

Original article

Pages

190-195

Published online

2020-12-30

Page views

2079

Article views/downloads

513

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2020.0151

Pubmed

33438187

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2022;81(1):190-195.

Keywords

intercondylar notch
meniscofemoral ligament
knee and magnetic resonance

Authors

M. Minic
I. Zivanovic-Macuzic
M. Jakovcevski
M. Kovacevic
S. Minic
D. Jeremic

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