open access

Vol 80, No 4 (2021)
Case report
Submitted: 2020-07-24
Accepted: 2020-10-18
Published online: 2020-10-27
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An unusual anatomical variant of the left phrenic nerve encircling the transverse cervical artery

J. H. Lee1, H. T. Kim2, I. J. Choi1, Y. R. Heo1, Y. W. Jung3
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2020.0131
·
Pubmed: 33124034
·
Folia Morphol 2021;80(4):1027-1031.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu, Korea, Republic Of
  2. Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu, Korea, Republic Of
  3. Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Dongguk University, Gyeongju, Korea, Republic Of

open access

Vol 80, No 4 (2021)
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2020-07-24
Accepted: 2020-10-18
Published online: 2020-10-27

Abstract

During educational dissection of cadavers, we encountered anatomical variability of the left phrenic nerve (PN). In this cadaver, nerve fibres from C3 and C4 descended and crossed behind the transverse cervical artery (TCA), a branch of the thyrocervical trunk, at the level of the anterior scalene muscle. On the other hand, nerve fibres from C5 descended obliquely above the TCA and then joined the fibres from C3–C4 on the medial side of the anterior scalene muscle to form the PN. To our knowledge, the encircling of the TCA by the left PN in the neck has not yet been reported and may pose a potential risk for nerve compression during movement of the neck. We discuss several types of anatomical variants of the PN and the associated risk during thorax and neck dissection procedures.

Abstract

During educational dissection of cadavers, we encountered anatomical variability of the left phrenic nerve (PN). In this cadaver, nerve fibres from C3 and C4 descended and crossed behind the transverse cervical artery (TCA), a branch of the thyrocervical trunk, at the level of the anterior scalene muscle. On the other hand, nerve fibres from C5 descended obliquely above the TCA and then joined the fibres from C3–C4 on the medial side of the anterior scalene muscle to form the PN. To our knowledge, the encircling of the TCA by the left PN in the neck has not yet been reported and may pose a potential risk for nerve compression during movement of the neck. We discuss several types of anatomical variants of the PN and the associated risk during thorax and neck dissection procedures.

Get Citation

Keywords

phrenic nerve, transverse cervical artery, variation

About this article
Title

An unusual anatomical variant of the left phrenic nerve encircling the transverse cervical artery

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 80, No 4 (2021)

Article type

Case report

Pages

1027-1031

Published online

2020-10-27

Page views

2247

Article views/downloads

972

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2020.0131

Pubmed

33124034

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2021;80(4):1027-1031.

Keywords

phrenic nerve
transverse cervical artery
variation

Authors

J. H. Lee
H. T. Kim
I. J. Choi
Y. R. Heo
Y. W. Jung

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