open access

Vol 80, No 4 (2021)
Original article
Submitted: 2020-05-29
Accepted: 2020-09-03
Published online: 2020-09-11
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New accessory palatine canals and foramina in cone-beam computed tomography

H. A.M. Marzook1, A. A Elgendy2, F. A. Darweesh3
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2020.0114
·
Pubmed: 32964408
·
Folia Morphol 2021;80(4):954-962.
Affiliations
  1. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Mansoura University, Mansouura, Egypt
  2. Endodontics, Head of Conservative Dentistry Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt
  3. Oral Biology Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt

open access

Vol 80, No 4 (2021)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2020-05-29
Accepted: 2020-09-03
Published online: 2020-09-11

Abstract

Background: Palatal surgeries are associated with many complications. Accessory foramina may be a cause of concern. The present study was conducted to assess the presence and to evaluate the anatomical characteristics of accessory palatine foramina (APF) and related bony canals in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans.
Materials and methods: The incidence, location, and types of foramina on the palate were evaluated in 170 CBCT scans. Readings from coronal, sagittal, and axial planes were recorded using a computer programme and evaluated.
Results: Other than nasopalatine, greater and lesser palatine foramina, 278 foramina were seen in the palate in different locations. New APF were found posteriorly in 14.71% of the studied scans with wide anatomical variations. Unusual foraminal canals were seen crossing the antral floor laterally. The anterior APF were seen in 73.53% of scans while bilateral APF were found in 43.53% of cases.
Conclusions: Accessory palatine foramina and related canals are frequently seen in CBCT with many anatomical variations. New unusual connecting canals are found passing through the antral floor from palatine foramina to the lateral antral wall. These anatomical structures should be considered in preoperative planning for local analgesia and surgical interventions in the palate.

Abstract

Background: Palatal surgeries are associated with many complications. Accessory foramina may be a cause of concern. The present study was conducted to assess the presence and to evaluate the anatomical characteristics of accessory palatine foramina (APF) and related bony canals in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans.
Materials and methods: The incidence, location, and types of foramina on the palate were evaluated in 170 CBCT scans. Readings from coronal, sagittal, and axial planes were recorded using a computer programme and evaluated.
Results: Other than nasopalatine, greater and lesser palatine foramina, 278 foramina were seen in the palate in different locations. New APF were found posteriorly in 14.71% of the studied scans with wide anatomical variations. Unusual foraminal canals were seen crossing the antral floor laterally. The anterior APF were seen in 73.53% of scans while bilateral APF were found in 43.53% of cases.
Conclusions: Accessory palatine foramina and related canals are frequently seen in CBCT with many anatomical variations. New unusual connecting canals are found passing through the antral floor from palatine foramina to the lateral antral wall. These anatomical structures should be considered in preoperative planning for local analgesia and surgical interventions in the palate.

Get Citation

Keywords

cone-beam computed tomography, anatomical landmarks, new palatine foramina, nasopalatine foramen, palate, canalis sinuosus

About this article
Title

New accessory palatine canals and foramina in cone-beam computed tomography

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 80, No 4 (2021)

Article type

Original article

Pages

954-962

Published online

2020-09-11

Page views

2780

Article views/downloads

1050

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2020.0114

Pubmed

32964408

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2021;80(4):954-962.

Keywords

cone-beam computed tomography
anatomical landmarks
new palatine foramina
nasopalatine foramen
palate
canalis sinuosus

Authors

H. A.M. Marzook
A. A Elgendy
F. A. Darweesh

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