open access

Vol 80, No 4 (2021)
Review article
Submitted: 2020-07-05
Accepted: 2020-08-21
Published online: 2020-09-02
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Corona mortis, aberrant obturator vessels, accessory obturator vessels: clinical applications in gynaecology

S. Kostov1, S. Slavchev1, D. Dzhenkov2, G. Stoyanov2, N. Dimitrov3, A. Danchev Yordanov4
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2020.0110
·
Pubmed: 32896869
·
Folia Morphol 2021;80(4):776-785.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Gynaecology, Medical University Varna, Bulgaria
  2. Department of General and Clinical Pathology, Forensic Medicine and Deontology, Division of General and Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University Varna “Prof. Dr. Paraskev Stoyanov”, Varna, Bulgaria
  3. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Trakia University, Stara Zagora, Bulgaria
  4. Department of Gynaecologic Oncology, Medical University Pleven, Bulgaria

open access

Vol 80, No 4 (2021)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Submitted: 2020-07-05
Accepted: 2020-08-21
Published online: 2020-09-02

Abstract

Corona mortis (CMOR) is a heterogeneous and often dubious term that causes much confusion in medical literature, especially in regard to its modern day significance in pelvic surgery. Some authors define CMOR as any abnormal anastomotic vessel between the external iliac and obturator vessels, whereas others define it as any vessel coursing over the superior pubic branch, regardless whether it is a vascular anastomosis, an accessory obturator vessels, an obturator vessel related to the external iliac system or a terminal small vessel. There is no standard classification of CMOR and obturator vessels variations, although there are multitudes of classifications describing the diverse variations in the obturator foramen region. We define accessory obturator, aberrant obturator vessels and CMOR as different structures, as CMOR is an anatomical term that reflects a clinical situation rather than an anatomical structure. A new clinical classification for aberrant, accessory obturator vessels and CMOR is proposed regarding the anatomical variations, and the location of vessels to the deep femoral ring. The clinical significance of accessory obturator, aberrant vessels and CMOR is delineated in oncogynaecological and urogynaecological surgery.

Abstract

Corona mortis (CMOR) is a heterogeneous and often dubious term that causes much confusion in medical literature, especially in regard to its modern day significance in pelvic surgery. Some authors define CMOR as any abnormal anastomotic vessel between the external iliac and obturator vessels, whereas others define it as any vessel coursing over the superior pubic branch, regardless whether it is a vascular anastomosis, an accessory obturator vessels, an obturator vessel related to the external iliac system or a terminal small vessel. There is no standard classification of CMOR and obturator vessels variations, although there are multitudes of classifications describing the diverse variations in the obturator foramen region. We define accessory obturator, aberrant obturator vessels and CMOR as different structures, as CMOR is an anatomical term that reflects a clinical situation rather than an anatomical structure. A new clinical classification for aberrant, accessory obturator vessels and CMOR is proposed regarding the anatomical variations, and the location of vessels to the deep femoral ring. The clinical significance of accessory obturator, aberrant vessels and CMOR is delineated in oncogynaecological and urogynaecological surgery.

Get Citation

Keywords

corona mortis, aberrant obturator vessels, accessory obturator vessels, deep femoral ring, oncogynaecology, urogynaecology

About this article
Title

Corona mortis, aberrant obturator vessels, accessory obturator vessels: clinical applications in gynaecology

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 80, No 4 (2021)

Article type

Review article

Pages

776-785

Published online

2020-09-02

Page views

2801

Article views/downloads

1201

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2020.0110

Pubmed

32896869

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2021;80(4):776-785.

Keywords

corona mortis
aberrant obturator vessels
accessory obturator vessels
deep femoral ring
oncogynaecology
urogynaecology

Authors

S. Kostov
S. Slavchev
D. Dzhenkov
G. Stoyanov
N. Dimitrov
A. Danchev Yordanov

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