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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-07-08
Submitted: 2019-05-30
Accepted: 2019-07-01
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Biochemical and histological study on the effect of levetiracetam on the liver and kidney of pregnant albino rats

Walaa Sayed Sabbah, Safaa Masoud Hanafy, Mona AbdellatIf Arafa
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0077
·
Pubmed: 31448813

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-07-08
Submitted: 2019-05-30
Accepted: 2019-07-01

Abstract

Background: Levetiracetam is a broad-spectrum antiseizure agent and one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for epilepsy. The aim of this work was assess the effect of levetiracetam at its therapeutic range on the liver and kidney of pregnant albino rats.

Material and methods: Forty pregnant rats were divided equally into two groups (I–II), Rats in the group I were gavaged 1.5 ml/day distilled water in two divided doses throughout pregnancy. Rats in the group II were gavaged 1.5 ml/day distilled water (containing 36 mg levetiracetam) in two divided doses throughout pregnancy. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were taken and the sera were separated and used for biochemical analysis. The Kidneys and livers of both groups were excised and used for light and electron microscopic examination.

Results: Treatment with levetiracetam induced undesirable histopathological changes in the liver and kidney of pregnant albino rats. These changes were in the form of distortion of the hepatic architecture, dilatation of the central and the portal veins, widening of the Bowman’s spaces, thickening and disruption of the glomerular basement membrane, fusion and effacement of secondary foot processes, cytoplasmic vacuolation, and swollen mitochondria with loss of their cristae. Such changes were confirmed by alteration of certain biochemical parameters related to the liver and kidney functions.

Conclusions: Authors concluded that levetiracetam induced deleterious effects on the liver and kidney of pregnant albino rats. Further investigations is recommended to clarify the mechanism of levetiracetam toxicity.

Abstract

Background: Levetiracetam is a broad-spectrum antiseizure agent and one of the most commonly prescribed drugs for epilepsy. The aim of this work was assess the effect of levetiracetam at its therapeutic range on the liver and kidney of pregnant albino rats.

Material and methods: Forty pregnant rats were divided equally into two groups (I–II), Rats in the group I were gavaged 1.5 ml/day distilled water in two divided doses throughout pregnancy. Rats in the group II were gavaged 1.5 ml/day distilled water (containing 36 mg levetiracetam) in two divided doses throughout pregnancy. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were taken and the sera were separated and used for biochemical analysis. The Kidneys and livers of both groups were excised and used for light and electron microscopic examination.

Results: Treatment with levetiracetam induced undesirable histopathological changes in the liver and kidney of pregnant albino rats. These changes were in the form of distortion of the hepatic architecture, dilatation of the central and the portal veins, widening of the Bowman’s spaces, thickening and disruption of the glomerular basement membrane, fusion and effacement of secondary foot processes, cytoplasmic vacuolation, and swollen mitochondria with loss of their cristae. Such changes were confirmed by alteration of certain biochemical parameters related to the liver and kidney functions.

Conclusions: Authors concluded that levetiracetam induced deleterious effects on the liver and kidney of pregnant albino rats. Further investigations is recommended to clarify the mechanism of levetiracetam toxicity.

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Keywords

levetiracetam, liver, kidney, pregnant rats

About this article
Title

Biochemical and histological study on the effect of levetiracetam on the liver and kidney of pregnant albino rats

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2019-07-08

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0077

Pubmed

31448813

Keywords

levetiracetam
liver
kidney
pregnant rats

Authors

Walaa Sayed Sabbah
Safaa Masoud Hanafy
Mona AbdellatIf Arafa

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