open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-05-20
Submitted: 2019-04-04
Accepted: 2019-05-04
Get Citation

Skeletopy of the intumescentia lumbalis and conus medullaris applied to epidural anesthesia in Leopardus geoffroyi

Pedro Henrique Silveira Mengue, Erick Candiota Souza, Fernanda Coelho Simas Bernardes, Marelise Moral Montana, Roberto Thiesen, Paulo de Souza Junior
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0061
·
Pubmed: 31282550

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-05-20
Submitted: 2019-04-04
Accepted: 2019-05-04

Abstract

Leopardus geoffroyi is a neotropical wild felid with wide distribution in the south of the South American continent. The objective was to investigate the skeletopy of the intumescentia lumbalis (IL) and conus medullaris (CM) from eleven specimens of L. geoffroyi collected dead on highways. The cadavers were fixed in formaldehyde solution and dissected to allow the dorsal exposure of IL and CM. The cranial and caudal limits were marked with radiopaque pins and radiographic projections were used to determine the skeletopy. The lengths of IL and CM were measured with a pachymeter. In most specimens, the IL was located at the level of L4 and L5 vertebrae, although in four (one male and three female) individuals its cranial limit was L3 and in three specimens (two male and one female) the caudal limit was L6. The length of IL (ILL) was 35.6 ± 6.7 mm. The CM had its base predominantly at the level of the L5 vertebra, although in some specimens the base was in L4 and in others in L6. The apex of the CM can be found since the lumbosacral junction until the level of the Cd2 vertebra. The CM measured 74.4 ± 14.3 mm. Based on the skeletopy, it can be suggested that epidural anesthesia procedures in L. geoffroyi are safer with the introduction of the catheter through the sacrocaudal interarcual space, as recommended by some anesthetists for the domestic cat.

Abstract

Leopardus geoffroyi is a neotropical wild felid with wide distribution in the south of the South American continent. The objective was to investigate the skeletopy of the intumescentia lumbalis (IL) and conus medullaris (CM) from eleven specimens of L. geoffroyi collected dead on highways. The cadavers were fixed in formaldehyde solution and dissected to allow the dorsal exposure of IL and CM. The cranial and caudal limits were marked with radiopaque pins and radiographic projections were used to determine the skeletopy. The lengths of IL and CM were measured with a pachymeter. In most specimens, the IL was located at the level of L4 and L5 vertebrae, although in four (one male and three female) individuals its cranial limit was L3 and in three specimens (two male and one female) the caudal limit was L6. The length of IL (ILL) was 35.6 ± 6.7 mm. The CM had its base predominantly at the level of the L5 vertebra, although in some specimens the base was in L4 and in others in L6. The apex of the CM can be found since the lumbosacral junction until the level of the Cd2 vertebra. The CM measured 74.4 ± 14.3 mm. Based on the skeletopy, it can be suggested that epidural anesthesia procedures in L. geoffroyi are safer with the introduction of the catheter through the sacrocaudal interarcual space, as recommended by some anesthetists for the domestic cat.

Get Citation

Keywords

carnivorans, Geoffroy’s cat, spinal cord, wild felids

About this article
Title

Skeletopy of the intumescentia lumbalis and conus medullaris applied to epidural anesthesia in Leopardus geoffroyi

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2019-05-20

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0061

Pubmed

31282550

Keywords

carnivorans
Geoffroy’s cat
spinal cord
wild felids

Authors

Pedro Henrique Silveira Mengue
Erick Candiota Souza
Fernanda Coelho Simas Bernardes
Marelise Moral Montana
Roberto Thiesen
Paulo de Souza Junior

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl