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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-03-13
Submitted: 2018-11-01
Accepted: 2019-02-15
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Comparison of CBCT and panoramic radiography for mandibular morphometry

Melek Tassoker, Duygu Akin, Anil Didem Aydin Kabakci, Sevgi Sener
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0031
·
Pubmed: 30888681

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-03-13
Submitted: 2018-11-01
Accepted: 2019-02-15

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the morphological differences in the mandible between patients with six age groups and to detect the correlation between these parameters on panoramic radiography (PR) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A total of 121 subjects (50 males and 71 females) were included in the study and were divided into six age groups (10-19,20-29,30-39,40-49,50-59 and 60-69) on the basis of the chronological age. CBCT and PR methods were used to record the mandibular measurements for the same 121 patients. Differences between male and female mandibular morphometric measurements, between right and left side measurements, and differences in age subgroups compared by using independent samples t-test, paired samples t-test, and one-way ANOVA test, respectively. P<0.05 value was considered statistically significant for all analysis. Males mostly have higher mandibular measurement values. There were statistically significant differences between CBCT and PR measurements (p<0.05). PR mostly showed higher values than CBCT measurements. Based on the fact that PRs showing significant differences from CBCT in the morphometric measurements made on mandible, it is recommended that forensic doctors and anthropologists consider this information in their age and gender prediction studies.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to compare the morphological differences in the mandible between patients with six age groups and to detect the correlation between these parameters on panoramic radiography (PR) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A total of 121 subjects (50 males and 71 females) were included in the study and were divided into six age groups (10-19,20-29,30-39,40-49,50-59 and 60-69) on the basis of the chronological age. CBCT and PR methods were used to record the mandibular measurements for the same 121 patients. Differences between male and female mandibular morphometric measurements, between right and left side measurements, and differences in age subgroups compared by using independent samples t-test, paired samples t-test, and one-way ANOVA test, respectively. P<0.05 value was considered statistically significant for all analysis. Males mostly have higher mandibular measurement values. There were statistically significant differences between CBCT and PR measurements (p<0.05). PR mostly showed higher values than CBCT measurements. Based on the fact that PRs showing significant differences from CBCT in the morphometric measurements made on mandible, it is recommended that forensic doctors and anthropologists consider this information in their age and gender prediction studies.

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Keywords

Gonial angle; mandible; panoramic radiography; cone-beam computed tomography; morphology

About this article
Title

Comparison of CBCT and panoramic radiography for mandibular morphometry

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2019-03-13

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0031

Pubmed

30888681

Keywords

Gonial angle
mandible
panoramic radiography
cone-beam computed tomography
morphology

Authors

Melek Tassoker
Duygu Akin
Anil Didem Aydin Kabakci
Sevgi Sener

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