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CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2019-02-25
Submitted: 2018-12-20
Accepted: 2019-02-09
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An unusual case of asymmetrical combined variations of the subclavian and axillary artery with clinical significance

Eleni Panagouli, Konstantinos Natsis, Maria Piagkou, Georgia Kostare, Gregory Tsoucalas, Dionysios Venieratos
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0020
·
Pubmed: 30816550

open access

Ahead of Print
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2019-02-25
Submitted: 2018-12-20
Accepted: 2019-02-09

Abstract

In a Greek Caucasian male cadaver, a combination of the following arterial variations were observed: an aberrant right subclavian artery originating as a last branch of the aortic arch and coursed posterior to the esophagus, a right non-recurrent laryngeal nerve, an atypical origin of the left suprascapular artery from the axillary artery, an unusual emersion of the lateral thoracic artery from the subscapular artery and a separate origin of the left thoracodorsal artery from the axillary artery. According to the available literature the corresponding incidences of the referred variants are: 0.7% for the aberrant right subclavian artery, 1.6-3.8% for the origin of the suprascapular artery from the axillary artery, 3% for the origin of the left thoracodorsal artery from the axillary artery and 30% for the origin of the lateral thoracic artery from the subscapular artery. Such unusual coexistence of arterial variations may developmentally be explained and has important clinical significance.

Abstract

In a Greek Caucasian male cadaver, a combination of the following arterial variations were observed: an aberrant right subclavian artery originating as a last branch of the aortic arch and coursed posterior to the esophagus, a right non-recurrent laryngeal nerve, an atypical origin of the left suprascapular artery from the axillary artery, an unusual emersion of the lateral thoracic artery from the subscapular artery and a separate origin of the left thoracodorsal artery from the axillary artery. According to the available literature the corresponding incidences of the referred variants are: 0.7% for the aberrant right subclavian artery, 1.6-3.8% for the origin of the suprascapular artery from the axillary artery, 3% for the origin of the left thoracodorsal artery from the axillary artery and 30% for the origin of the lateral thoracic artery from the subscapular artery. Such unusual coexistence of arterial variations may developmentally be explained and has important clinical significance.

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Keywords

aberrant right subclavian artery, suprascapular artery, lateral thoracic artery, thoracodorsal artery, subscapular artery, esophagus, non-recurrent laryngeal nerve

About this article
Title

An unusual case of asymmetrical combined variations of the subclavian and axillary artery with clinical significance

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2019-02-25

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0020

Pubmed

30816550

Keywords

aberrant right subclavian artery
suprascapular artery
lateral thoracic artery
thoracodorsal artery
subscapular artery
esophagus
non-recurrent laryngeal nerve

Authors

Eleni Panagouli
Konstantinos Natsis
Maria Piagkou
Georgia Kostare
Gregory Tsoucalas
Dionysios Venieratos

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