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CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2019-02-25
Submitted: 2019-01-15
Accepted: 2019-02-12
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Bilateral giant and unilateral duplicated sphenoidal tubercle

Mugurel Constantin Rusu, Radu Constantin Ciuluvică, Alexandra Diana Vrapciu, Andrei Leonid Chiriţă, Mihai Predoiu, Nicoleta Măru
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0019
·
Pubmed: 30816551

open access

Ahead of Print
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2019-02-25
Submitted: 2019-01-15
Accepted: 2019-02-12

Abstract

The sphenoidal tubercle (SphT), also known as pyramidal tubercle or infratemporal spine projects from the anterior end of the infratemporal crest of the greater sphenoidal wing. As it masquerades the lateral entrance in the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) it could obstruct surgical corridors or the access for anaesthetic punctures. The SphT is, however, an overlooked structure in the anatomical literature. During a routine Cone Beam Computed Tomography study in an adult male patient we found bilateral giant SphTs transforming the infratemporal surfaces of the greater wing into veritable pterygoid foveae. Moreover, on one side the SphT appeared bifid, with a main giant partition, of 9.17 mm vertical length, and a secondary laminar one. The opposite SphT had 14.80 mm. In our knowledge, such giant and bifid SphTs were not reported previously and are major obstacles if surgical access towards the PPF and the skull base is intended.

Abstract

The sphenoidal tubercle (SphT), also known as pyramidal tubercle or infratemporal spine projects from the anterior end of the infratemporal crest of the greater sphenoidal wing. As it masquerades the lateral entrance in the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) it could obstruct surgical corridors or the access for anaesthetic punctures. The SphT is, however, an overlooked structure in the anatomical literature. During a routine Cone Beam Computed Tomography study in an adult male patient we found bilateral giant SphTs transforming the infratemporal surfaces of the greater wing into veritable pterygoid foveae. Moreover, on one side the SphT appeared bifid, with a main giant partition, of 9.17 mm vertical length, and a secondary laminar one. The opposite SphT had 14.80 mm. In our knowledge, such giant and bifid SphTs were not reported previously and are major obstacles if surgical access towards the PPF and the skull base is intended.

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Keywords

greater wing of the sphenoid bone, pterygopalatine fossa, cone beam computed tomography, infratemporal fossa, maxillary nerve

About this article
Title

Bilateral giant and unilateral duplicated sphenoidal tubercle

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2019-02-25

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0019

Pubmed

30816551

Keywords

greater wing of the sphenoid bone
pterygopalatine fossa
cone beam computed tomography
infratemporal fossa
maxillary nerve

Authors

Mugurel Constantin Rusu
Radu Constantin Ciuluvică
Alexandra Diana Vrapciu
Andrei Leonid Chiriţă
Mihai Predoiu
Nicoleta Măru

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