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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-02-15
Submitted: 2019-01-01
Accepted: 2019-02-03
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The possible protective effects of virgin olive oil and Nigella Sativa seeds on the biochemical and histopathological changes in pancreas of hyperlipidemic rats

Laila M. Aboul-Mahasen, Rasha Abdulrahman Alshali
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0017
·
Pubmed: 30816553

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-02-15
Submitted: 2019-01-01
Accepted: 2019-02-03

Abstract

Background: Hyperlipidemia is a risk factor for the development and progression of atherosclerosis and is linked to various diseases. This study was done to evaluate the possible protective effects of virgin olive oil and Nigella sativa seeds on the biochemical and histopathological changes which occurred in the pancreas of the rats. The study lasts 8 weeks and included 24 albino rats that were divided into four groups (6 rats each); group I, control group, fed with normal standard diet, group II fed with high fat diet (HFD), group III fed with HFD and virgin Olive oil, group IV fed with HFD and Nigella sativa seeds powder. Materials and Methods: After finished the experiment, blood samples collected and assessed for the lipid profile, fasting blood sugar, pancreatic amylase and insulin levels. Then, the rats were sacrificed and the pancreata were extracted and slices of them were processed for histological examination using hematoxylin stain and Masson's Trichrome stain . Small fragments from the tail of the pancreata were extracted and processed for electron microscopic examination. The statistical analysis of the data using the appropriate statistical tests was also conducted. Results: In the present study, the serum lipid profile in hyperlipidemic rats are ameliorated in rats fed on high fat diet with virgin olive oil or Nigella sativa seeds powder as a significant decrease in total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides. Moreover, while Nigella sativa decreases HDL, virgin olive oil increases significantly HDL . Also a significant decrease in the serum levels of blood glucose and amylase and a significant increase in insulin levels are present in these groups . The histological and ultrastructural results revealed regeneration of the exocrine and endocrine parts of the pancreatic tissues from the hyperlipidemic rats fed with virgin olive oil or Nigella sativa seeds . Conclusions and recommendations: From this study, the biochemical results were paralleled to the histological and ultrastructural results , so it could be concluded that virgin olive oil and Nigella sativa seeds had antihyperlipidemic and hypoglycemic effects and they could protect the pancreas from hyperlipidemia -induced injury and the daily consumption of virgin olive oil and Nigella sativa seeds in the diets is highly recommended .

Abstract

Background: Hyperlipidemia is a risk factor for the development and progression of atherosclerosis and is linked to various diseases. This study was done to evaluate the possible protective effects of virgin olive oil and Nigella sativa seeds on the biochemical and histopathological changes which occurred in the pancreas of the rats. The study lasts 8 weeks and included 24 albino rats that were divided into four groups (6 rats each); group I, control group, fed with normal standard diet, group II fed with high fat diet (HFD), group III fed with HFD and virgin Olive oil, group IV fed with HFD and Nigella sativa seeds powder. Materials and Methods: After finished the experiment, blood samples collected and assessed for the lipid profile, fasting blood sugar, pancreatic amylase and insulin levels. Then, the rats were sacrificed and the pancreata were extracted and slices of them were processed for histological examination using hematoxylin stain and Masson's Trichrome stain . Small fragments from the tail of the pancreata were extracted and processed for electron microscopic examination. The statistical analysis of the data using the appropriate statistical tests was also conducted. Results: In the present study, the serum lipid profile in hyperlipidemic rats are ameliorated in rats fed on high fat diet with virgin olive oil or Nigella sativa seeds powder as a significant decrease in total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides. Moreover, while Nigella sativa decreases HDL, virgin olive oil increases significantly HDL . Also a significant decrease in the serum levels of blood glucose and amylase and a significant increase in insulin levels are present in these groups . The histological and ultrastructural results revealed regeneration of the exocrine and endocrine parts of the pancreatic tissues from the hyperlipidemic rats fed with virgin olive oil or Nigella sativa seeds . Conclusions and recommendations: From this study, the biochemical results were paralleled to the histological and ultrastructural results , so it could be concluded that virgin olive oil and Nigella sativa seeds had antihyperlipidemic and hypoglycemic effects and they could protect the pancreas from hyperlipidemia -induced injury and the daily consumption of virgin olive oil and Nigella sativa seeds in the diets is highly recommended .

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Keywords

Pancreas, Virgin olive oil, Nigella sativa seeds, Hyperlipidemia, Pancreatitis

About this article
Title

The possible protective effects of virgin olive oil and Nigella Sativa seeds on the biochemical and histopathological changes in pancreas of hyperlipidemic rats

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2019-02-15

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0017

Pubmed

30816553

Keywords

Pancreas
Virgin olive oil
Nigella sativa seeds
Hyperlipidemia
Pancreatitis

Authors

Laila M. Aboul-Mahasen
Rasha Abdulrahman Alshali

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