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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-12-05
Submitted: 2018-10-08
Accepted: 2018-10-30
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Effects of formaldehyde on VEGF, MMP2, and Osteonectin levels in periodontal membrane and alveolar bone in the rats

Nihat Laçin, Bozan Serhat İzol, Mehmet Cudi Tuncer, Ebru Gökalp Özkorkmaz, Buşra Deveci, Engin Deveci
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0110
·
Pubmed: 30536359

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-12-05
Submitted: 2018-10-08
Accepted: 2018-10-30

Abstract

Background: The objective of this  study was to investigate if   long term formaldehyde inhalation may effect periodontal membrane and alveolar bone loss  leading to periodontitis. the negative effects of formaldehyde was described using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP2) and Osteonectin antibodies involved in the extracellular matrix and angiogenetic development.

Materials and methods: Thirty adult Wistar albino rats were used in this study. Rats were divided into two groups, control (n:15) and  formaldehyde administered group  (n:15). Formaldehyde group was administered 10 ppm formaldehyde during 5 days a week for 8 hours by inhalation. Maxillary bone regions were dissected under anesthesia. After  fixation in 10% formaldehyde solution, tissues were passed through  graded ethanol series to obtain paraffin blocks. Five-micrometer histological sections were cut with RM2265 rotary microtome stained with   Masson- Trichrome and VEGF, MMP2 and Osteonectin antibodies for -examination under  Olympus BH-2 light microscopy.

Results: The present study revealed  that congestion in blood vessels, degeneration of collagen fibers and alveolar matrix  around alveolar bone were observed to be more significant in formaldehyde group than the control group (P≤0.001 ). Interestingly, VEGF expression in  the formaldehyde group was the most significant finding between the two groups (P<0.001). When compared inflammation, MMP2 and osteonectin expressions were significant (P<0.01) in the formaldehyde group.

Conclusions: It was suggested that formaldehyde toxicity decreased the expression of MMP2  and in osteoblasts as well as affecting the retention of MMP levels in tooth cavity, which is very low in collagen fibers. But,  vise versa for the expression of  VEGF in dilated vascular endothelial cells and osteocytes in alveolar bone.   As a conclusion,formaldehyde disrupts the periodontal membrane and may cause collagen fibers degeneration by affecting the alveolar bone matrix.

Abstract

Background: The objective of this  study was to investigate if   long term formaldehyde inhalation may effect periodontal membrane and alveolar bone loss  leading to periodontitis. the negative effects of formaldehyde was described using vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP2) and Osteonectin antibodies involved in the extracellular matrix and angiogenetic development.

Materials and methods: Thirty adult Wistar albino rats were used in this study. Rats were divided into two groups, control (n:15) and  formaldehyde administered group  (n:15). Formaldehyde group was administered 10 ppm formaldehyde during 5 days a week for 8 hours by inhalation. Maxillary bone regions were dissected under anesthesia. After  fixation in 10% formaldehyde solution, tissues were passed through  graded ethanol series to obtain paraffin blocks. Five-micrometer histological sections were cut with RM2265 rotary microtome stained with   Masson- Trichrome and VEGF, MMP2 and Osteonectin antibodies for -examination under  Olympus BH-2 light microscopy.

Results: The present study revealed  that congestion in blood vessels, degeneration of collagen fibers and alveolar matrix  around alveolar bone were observed to be more significant in formaldehyde group than the control group (P≤0.001 ). Interestingly, VEGF expression in  the formaldehyde group was the most significant finding between the two groups (P<0.001). When compared inflammation, MMP2 and osteonectin expressions were significant (P<0.01) in the formaldehyde group.

Conclusions: It was suggested that formaldehyde toxicity decreased the expression of MMP2  and in osteoblasts as well as affecting the retention of MMP levels in tooth cavity, which is very low in collagen fibers. But,  vise versa for the expression of  VEGF in dilated vascular endothelial cells and osteocytes in alveolar bone.   As a conclusion,formaldehyde disrupts the periodontal membrane and may cause collagen fibers degeneration by affecting the alveolar bone matrix.

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Keywords

periodontal membrane, alveolar bone, formaldehyde, immunohistochemistry

About this article
Title

Effects of formaldehyde on VEGF, MMP2, and Osteonectin levels in periodontal membrane and alveolar bone in the rats

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2018-12-05

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0110

Pubmed

30536359

Keywords

periodontal membrane
alveolar bone
formaldehyde
immunohistochemistry

Authors

Nihat Laçin
Bozan Serhat İzol
Mehmet Cudi Tuncer
Ebru Gökalp Özkorkmaz
Buşra Deveci
Engin Deveci

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