open access

Vol 78, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-10-19
Submitted: 2018-09-24
Accepted: 2018-10-10
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Body donation for research and teaching purposes: the contribution of blood donation units in the progress of anatomical science

A. Kostorrizos, A. Koukakis, A. Samolis, V. Protogerou, T. Mariolis-Sapsakos, M. Piagkou, K. Natsis, G. P. Skandalakis, T. Troupis
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0103
·
Pubmed: 30371929
·
Folia Morphol 2019;78(3):575-581.

open access

Vol 78, No 3 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-10-19
Submitted: 2018-09-24
Accepted: 2018-10-10

Abstract

Background: Cadaver’s dissection has a fundamental role in teaching and understanding the anatomy. Postmortem body donation (PMBD) is an important source of cadavers and provides an opportunity to carry out research or educational activities in medicine and surgery. The objective of the current study is to determine the perspectives and attitudes toward PMBD among blood donors (BLD) and elderly people. These data are fundamental to highlight the PMBD extent and individual factors that might influence PMBD.

Materials and methods: Six hundred and fifty questionnaires were distributed to 500 (327 male and 173 female, mean age 39.9 ± 9.6 years) blood donors (BLD) and 150 elderly people (62 males and 88 females, mean age 74 ± 9.4 years). A specially designed self-administered questionnaire covering demographic data, knowledge and attitude of the participants concerning body donation (BD) was used.

Results: Concerning the perception of BD among BLD and elderly people, the most common reason for BD in both study groups was the contribution in research, while the commonest reason for hesitating about BD was the lack of information, following by personal reasons. The BLD were more likely to be interested in BD for contribution in research and personal reasons. Additionally, BLD were less likely than the elderly to hesitate about BD for religious and personal reasons and more likely to hesitate about BD for not being informed. BLD who were interested in BD for contribution in research were significantly older. Elderly people who hesitated about BD for personal reasons were significantly older. In the BLD group, those who responded that blood and body donation are the same were significantly younger, while in the elderly group — significantly older. The proportion of BLD who declared that blood and body donation is the same was significantly higher in more educated people.

Conclusions: A need for well-organised and informative BD programmes is evident. Orientating the public towards this practice is of high moral and medical value, since with this important promotion the altruistic act of BD will expand globally.  

Abstract

Background: Cadaver’s dissection has a fundamental role in teaching and understanding the anatomy. Postmortem body donation (PMBD) is an important source of cadavers and provides an opportunity to carry out research or educational activities in medicine and surgery. The objective of the current study is to determine the perspectives and attitudes toward PMBD among blood donors (BLD) and elderly people. These data are fundamental to highlight the PMBD extent and individual factors that might influence PMBD.

Materials and methods: Six hundred and fifty questionnaires were distributed to 500 (327 male and 173 female, mean age 39.9 ± 9.6 years) blood donors (BLD) and 150 elderly people (62 males and 88 females, mean age 74 ± 9.4 years). A specially designed self-administered questionnaire covering demographic data, knowledge and attitude of the participants concerning body donation (BD) was used.

Results: Concerning the perception of BD among BLD and elderly people, the most common reason for BD in both study groups was the contribution in research, while the commonest reason for hesitating about BD was the lack of information, following by personal reasons. The BLD were more likely to be interested in BD for contribution in research and personal reasons. Additionally, BLD were less likely than the elderly to hesitate about BD for religious and personal reasons and more likely to hesitate about BD for not being informed. BLD who were interested in BD for contribution in research were significantly older. Elderly people who hesitated about BD for personal reasons were significantly older. In the BLD group, those who responded that blood and body donation are the same were significantly younger, while in the elderly group — significantly older. The proportion of BLD who declared that blood and body donation is the same was significantly higher in more educated people.

Conclusions: A need for well-organised and informative BD programmes is evident. Orientating the public towards this practice is of high moral and medical value, since with this important promotion the altruistic act of BD will expand globally.  

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Keywords

body donation; anatomy; teaching; medical education; cadaver

About this article
Title

Body donation for research and teaching purposes: the contribution of blood donation units in the progress of anatomical science

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 78, No 3 (2019)

Pages

575-581

Published online

2018-10-19

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0103

Pubmed

30371929

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2019;78(3):575-581.

Keywords

body donation
anatomy
teaching
medical education
cadaver

Authors

A. Kostorrizos
A. Koukakis
A. Samolis
V. Protogerou
T. Mariolis-Sapsakos
M. Piagkou
K. Natsis
G. P. Skandalakis
T. Troupis

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