open access

Vol 78, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-10-03
Submitted: 2018-07-19
Accepted: 2018-09-19
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Prevalence of second canal in the mesiobuccal root of permanent maxillary molars from a Turkish subpopulation: a cone-beam computed tomography study

G. Magat, S. Hakbilen
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0092
·
Pubmed: 30299533
·
Folia Morphol 2019;78(2):351-358.

open access

Vol 78, No 2 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-10-03
Submitted: 2018-07-19
Accepted: 2018-09-19

Abstract

Background: Permanent maxillary molar teeth have the most complex root and canal systems. This study aimed to determine the frequency and the localisation of secondary mesiobuccal canal (MB2) in the mesiobuccal roots of permanent maxillary molars in a Turkish subpopulation using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compare them by different age groups and gender. 

Materials and methods: In this retrospective study, a total of 800 maxillary molar teeth in 200 subjects were investigated. The distances between canals were calculated from the centre point of the MB2 canal (PMB2) to the centre point of the mesiobuccal canal (PMB1) and the centre point of the palatal canal (PP). 

Results: The incidence of MB2 canals was found to be 33.5% (23.2% in females, 43.6% in males) in 200 subjects. A significant difference was found between age groups and genders in terms of the frequency of MB2 (p < 0.05). The distances between PMB1- -PMB2 were 2.95 ± 0.58 mm, 3.08 ± 0.67 mm for 1MM and 2MM, respectively. For 1MM and 2MM, the averages of PMB2-PP distances were 5.81 ± 1.09 mm and 5.55 ± 1.09 mm, respectively. The contralateral formation of the MB2 canals was 90.5% (16, 26) in the first molars and 93.9% in the second molars (17, 27). The contingency rate in the first quadrant was 86.0% (16, 17) and 83.5% (26, 27) in the second quadrant. 

Conclusions: It is important for the clinician to know the high probability of finding the MB2 canal in the maxillary first and second molars. CBCT imaging can facilitate the clinician to detect complex and variable root canal anatomy. 

Abstract

Background: Permanent maxillary molar teeth have the most complex root and canal systems. This study aimed to determine the frequency and the localisation of secondary mesiobuccal canal (MB2) in the mesiobuccal roots of permanent maxillary molars in a Turkish subpopulation using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and compare them by different age groups and gender. 

Materials and methods: In this retrospective study, a total of 800 maxillary molar teeth in 200 subjects were investigated. The distances between canals were calculated from the centre point of the MB2 canal (PMB2) to the centre point of the mesiobuccal canal (PMB1) and the centre point of the palatal canal (PP). 

Results: The incidence of MB2 canals was found to be 33.5% (23.2% in females, 43.6% in males) in 200 subjects. A significant difference was found between age groups and genders in terms of the frequency of MB2 (p < 0.05). The distances between PMB1- -PMB2 were 2.95 ± 0.58 mm, 3.08 ± 0.67 mm for 1MM and 2MM, respectively. For 1MM and 2MM, the averages of PMB2-PP distances were 5.81 ± 1.09 mm and 5.55 ± 1.09 mm, respectively. The contralateral formation of the MB2 canals was 90.5% (16, 26) in the first molars and 93.9% in the second molars (17, 27). The contingency rate in the first quadrant was 86.0% (16, 17) and 83.5% (26, 27) in the second quadrant. 

Conclusions: It is important for the clinician to know the high probability of finding the MB2 canal in the maxillary first and second molars. CBCT imaging can facilitate the clinician to detect complex and variable root canal anatomy. 

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Keywords

maxillary molars; secondary mesiobuccal canal; cone-beam computed tomography

About this article
Title

Prevalence of second canal in the mesiobuccal root of permanent maxillary molars from a Turkish subpopulation: a cone-beam computed tomography study

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 78, No 2 (2019)

Pages

351-358

Published online

2018-10-03

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0092

Pubmed

30299533

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2019;78(2):351-358.

Keywords

maxillary molars
secondary mesiobuccal canal
cone-beam computed tomography

Authors

G. Magat
S. Hakbilen

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