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Submitted: 2023-10-11
Accepted: 2024-03-07
Published online: 2024-03-21
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The anatomy of the internal iliac artery: a meta-analysis

Mateusz Koziej12, Julia Toppich12, Jakub Wilk12, Dawid Plutecki3, Patryk Ostrowski12, Marta Fijałkowska4, Tomasz Bonczar12, Andrzej Dubrowski1, Małgorzata Mazur1, Jerzy Walocha12, Michał Bonczar12
·
Pubmed: 38512006
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College Cracow, Kraków, Poland
  2. Youthoria, Youth Research Organization, Kraków, Poland
  3. Jan Kochanowski University of Kielce — Collegium Medicum, Kielce, Poland
  4. Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, Second Chair of Surgery Medical University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland

open access

Ahead of Print
REVIEW ARTICLES
Submitted: 2023-10-11
Accepted: 2024-03-07
Published online: 2024-03-21

Abstract

Background: The internal iliac artery (IIA) originates from the common iliac artery at the level of the sacroiliac joint and bifurcates between the L5 and S1 vertebrae. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to demonstrate the most up-to-date and evidence-based data regarding the general anatomy of the IIA, including their variations, length, and diameter.

Materials and methods: Major online medical databases such as PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar were searched in order to find all studies considering the anatomy of the IIA. Eligibility assessment and data extraction stages were performed.

Results: In the general population the pooled prevalence of Type I (The superior gluteal artery arises independently with the inferior gluteal and internal pudendal arteries arising from a common trunk which dividing inside (Type IA) or outside (Type IB) pelvic cavity) was found to be 56.57% (95% CI: 53.00–60.10%). The pooled mean length of the IIA was set to be 39.95 mm (SE = 1.79) in the overall population. The pooled mean diameter of the IIA was found to be 6.86 mm (SE = 0.27).

Conclusions: The IIA is responsible for supplying the majority of the structures located in the pelvis. Hence, it is crucial to be aware of the possible variants of the said vessel. The results presented in our study may be highly significant in various surgical procedures performed in that region.

Abstract

Background: The internal iliac artery (IIA) originates from the common iliac artery at the level of the sacroiliac joint and bifurcates between the L5 and S1 vertebrae. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to demonstrate the most up-to-date and evidence-based data regarding the general anatomy of the IIA, including their variations, length, and diameter.

Materials and methods: Major online medical databases such as PubMed, Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar were searched in order to find all studies considering the anatomy of the IIA. Eligibility assessment and data extraction stages were performed.

Results: In the general population the pooled prevalence of Type I (The superior gluteal artery arises independently with the inferior gluteal and internal pudendal arteries arising from a common trunk which dividing inside (Type IA) or outside (Type IB) pelvic cavity) was found to be 56.57% (95% CI: 53.00–60.10%). The pooled mean length of the IIA was set to be 39.95 mm (SE = 1.79) in the overall population. The pooled mean diameter of the IIA was found to be 6.86 mm (SE = 0.27).

Conclusions: The IIA is responsible for supplying the majority of the structures located in the pelvis. Hence, it is crucial to be aware of the possible variants of the said vessel. The results presented in our study may be highly significant in various surgical procedures performed in that region.

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Keywords

internal iliac artery, common iliac artery, abdominal aorta, pelvis, surgery, anatomy

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Title

The anatomy of the internal iliac artery: a meta-analysis

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Review article

Published online

2024-03-21

Page views

137

Article views/downloads

115

DOI

10.5603/fm.97800

Pubmed

38512006

Keywords

internal iliac artery
common iliac artery
abdominal aorta
pelvis
surgery
anatomy

Authors

Mateusz Koziej
Julia Toppich
Jakub Wilk
Dawid Plutecki
Patryk Ostrowski
Marta Fijałkowska
Tomasz Bonczar
Andrzej Dubrowski
Małgorzata Mazur
Jerzy Walocha
Michał Bonczar

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