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Case report
Submitted: 2023-05-10
Accepted: 2023-08-04
Published online: 2023-11-08
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A three-headed plantaris muscle fused with Kaplan fibers: potential clinical significance

Krystian Maślanka1, Nicol Zielinska1, Friedrich Paulsen2, Małgorzata Niemiec3, Łukasz Olewnik1
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Pubmed: 37957936
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomical Dissection and Donation, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  2. Institute of Functional and Clinical Anatomy, Friedrich Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany
  3. Medical University of Silesia, Poland

open access

Ahead of Print
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2023-05-10
Accepted: 2023-08-04
Published online: 2023-11-08

Abstract

The plantaris is a short, small muscle that usually originates at the popliteal surface of the femur and has a long, thin tendon that typically inserts into the calcaneal tuberosity. Its role and degree of development have been objects of debate for years. Some authors consider it a vestigial muscle while others believe it is a process of its development. The clinical significance of plantaris muscle is usually related to its morphological variation, which is common and well described in the literature. These variations are often a risk factor for many ailments and disorders. We would like to present another, very rare case of three-headed plantaris muscle (fused with distal Kaplan fibers), and consider what clinical implications it may have.

Abstract

The plantaris is a short, small muscle that usually originates at the popliteal surface of the femur and has a long, thin tendon that typically inserts into the calcaneal tuberosity. Its role and degree of development have been objects of debate for years. Some authors consider it a vestigial muscle while others believe it is a process of its development. The clinical significance of plantaris muscle is usually related to its morphological variation, which is common and well described in the literature. These variations are often a risk factor for many ailments and disorders. We would like to present another, very rare case of three-headed plantaris muscle (fused with distal Kaplan fibers), and consider what clinical implications it may have.

Get Citation

Keywords

plantaris muscle, rudimentary muscle, development muscle, Kaplan fibers, knee stability, three headed plantaris

About this article
Title

A three-headed plantaris muscle fused with Kaplan fibers: potential clinical significance

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Article type

Case report

Published online

2023-11-08

Page views

165

Article views/downloads

137

DOI

10.5603/fm.95513

Pubmed

37957936

Keywords

plantaris muscle
rudimentary muscle
development muscle
Kaplan fibers
knee stability
three headed plantaris

Authors

Krystian Maślanka
Nicol Zielinska
Friedrich Paulsen
Małgorzata Niemiec
Łukasz Olewnik

References (31)
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