open access

Vol 82, No 3 (2023)
Original article
Submitted: 2022-09-24
Accepted: 2022-11-14
Published online: 2022-11-30
Get Citation

The occipital-vertebral anastomosis revisited

P. Ostrowski1, M. Bonczar1, Alicia del Carmen Yika1, H. Czekańska2, J. Batko1, W. Wojciechowski3, S. K. Ghosh4, J. Jaworek-Troć1, K. Piątek-Koziej1, A. Juszczak1, T. Gładysz1, D. Lusina1, J. Walocha1, M. Koziej1
·
Pubmed: 36472395
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(3):615-623.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland
  2. Department of Anatomy, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
  3. Department of Radiology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland
  4. Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, India

open access

Vol 82, No 3 (2023)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2022-09-24
Accepted: 2022-11-14
Published online: 2022-11-30

Abstract

Background: The goal of the study was to provide relevant data about the location
and prevalence of the occipital artery-vertebral artery (OA-VA) anastomosis
in patients without visible occlusive disease, as well as to thoroughly discuss the
clinical significance of these anastomotic channels. Furthermore, the morphometric
properties of the OA and its branches were also analysed.
Materials and methods: A retrospective study was carried out to indicate
anatomical variations, their prevalence, and morphometrical data on the OA
and its branches. The study was performed on 55 randomly selected computed
tomography angiographies (CTA) of the head and neck region. Each CTA result
was analysed bilaterally. Thus, 110 results were originally assessed.
Results: The OA median maximal diameter was demonstrated at 4.85 mm
(lower quartile [LQ]: 4.11; upper quartile [UQ]: 5.53) and the median maximal
diameter of VA at 3.60 mm (LQ: 2.79; UQ: 4.38). The distances between OA
and its branches were also measured giving a median result of 21.73, 30.29,
60.84, 34.88, 18.02, 55.16 mm for the lower and upper sternocleidomastoid
branch, meningeal branch, mastoid branch, and descending branch, respectively.
The median distance between OA and its first anastomosis was set to be
51.15 mm (LQ: 37.20; UQ: 60.10). Moreover, a set of additional measurements
was carried out in order to create a three-dimensional anatomical heat-map of
the occurrence of the OA-VA anastomosis.
Conclusions: Knowledge about the anatomy of the OA-VA anastomosis might
be of immense importance to avoid potentially fatal complications during embolisation
of the OA and its branches.

Abstract

Background: The goal of the study was to provide relevant data about the location
and prevalence of the occipital artery-vertebral artery (OA-VA) anastomosis
in patients without visible occlusive disease, as well as to thoroughly discuss the
clinical significance of these anastomotic channels. Furthermore, the morphometric
properties of the OA and its branches were also analysed.
Materials and methods: A retrospective study was carried out to indicate
anatomical variations, their prevalence, and morphometrical data on the OA
and its branches. The study was performed on 55 randomly selected computed
tomography angiographies (CTA) of the head and neck region. Each CTA result
was analysed bilaterally. Thus, 110 results were originally assessed.
Results: The OA median maximal diameter was demonstrated at 4.85 mm
(lower quartile [LQ]: 4.11; upper quartile [UQ]: 5.53) and the median maximal
diameter of VA at 3.60 mm (LQ: 2.79; UQ: 4.38). The distances between OA
and its branches were also measured giving a median result of 21.73, 30.29,
60.84, 34.88, 18.02, 55.16 mm for the lower and upper sternocleidomastoid
branch, meningeal branch, mastoid branch, and descending branch, respectively.
The median distance between OA and its first anastomosis was set to be
51.15 mm (LQ: 37.20; UQ: 60.10). Moreover, a set of additional measurements
was carried out in order to create a three-dimensional anatomical heat-map of
the occurrence of the OA-VA anastomosis.
Conclusions: Knowledge about the anatomy of the OA-VA anastomosis might
be of immense importance to avoid potentially fatal complications during embolisation
of the OA and its branches.

Get Citation

Keywords

occipital artery, anastomosis, anatomy, vertebral artery

About this article
Title

The occipital-vertebral anastomosis revisited

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 3 (2023)

Article type

Original article

Pages

615-623

Published online

2022-11-30

Page views

956

Article views/downloads

633

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0101

Pubmed

36472395

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(3):615-623.

Keywords

occipital artery
anastomosis
anatomy
vertebral artery

Authors

P. Ostrowski
M. Bonczar
Alicia del Carmen Yika
H. Czekańska
J. Batko
W. Wojciechowski
S. K. Ghosh
J. Jaworek-Troć
K. Piątek-Koziej
A. Juszczak
T. Gładysz
D. Lusina
J. Walocha
M. Koziej

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