open access

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)
Review article
Submitted: 2022-07-31
Accepted: 2022-09-09
Published online: 2022-09-27
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Anatomical variations in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist: meta-analysis

M. Bonczar1, J. Walocha1, A. Pasternak1, P. Depukat1, M. Dziedzic1, P. Ostrowski1, T. Bonczar1, Ł. Warchoł1, M. Koziej1
·
Pubmed: 36165900
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(4):766-776.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland

open access

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)
REVIEW ARTICLES
Submitted: 2022-07-31
Accepted: 2022-09-09
Published online: 2022-09-27

Abstract

Background: The first dorsal compartment of the wrist includes tendons of abductor
pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB). However, many studies
have showed multiple anatomical variations including anomalies in the number
of both APL and EPB tendons and presence of intercompartmental fibro-osseous
septum. Unfortunately, studies describing those variations are not consistent,
hence, the aim of this study was to provide most accurate data about these anatomical
variations in the population, using systematic review and meta-analysis.
Materials and methods: For this purpose, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science,
Embase and a number of minor online libraries were searched. Articles which
included exact data about the number of APL or EPB tendons or a presence
of intercompartmental septum were qualified for a more precise evaluation.
Therefore, out of 1629 studies initially evaluated, 68 were finally included in this
meta-analysis. We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews
and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines.
Results: A total of 5229 studied wrists have been included in this study. Double
APL and single EPB are the most common variations of tendons in the first dorsal
compartment, both in cadavers and patients with de Quervain’s disease, with
no statistically significant differences between those two groups. Presence of
intercompartmental fibro-osseus septum is much more common in patients with
de Quervain’s disease than in cadavers.
Conclusions: Our results should improve the awareness of anatomical variations
in the first dorsal compartment, which in turn should have impact on treatment
of de Quervain’s disease in clinical practice.

Abstract

Background: The first dorsal compartment of the wrist includes tendons of abductor
pollicis longus (APL) and extensor pollicis brevis (EPB). However, many studies
have showed multiple anatomical variations including anomalies in the number
of both APL and EPB tendons and presence of intercompartmental fibro-osseous
septum. Unfortunately, studies describing those variations are not consistent,
hence, the aim of this study was to provide most accurate data about these anatomical
variations in the population, using systematic review and meta-analysis.
Materials and methods: For this purpose, PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science,
Embase and a number of minor online libraries were searched. Articles which
included exact data about the number of APL or EPB tendons or a presence
of intercompartmental septum were qualified for a more precise evaluation.
Therefore, out of 1629 studies initially evaluated, 68 were finally included in this
meta-analysis. We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews
and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines.
Results: A total of 5229 studied wrists have been included in this study. Double
APL and single EPB are the most common variations of tendons in the first dorsal
compartment, both in cadavers and patients with de Quervain’s disease, with
no statistically significant differences between those two groups. Presence of
intercompartmental fibro-osseus septum is much more common in patients with
de Quervain’s disease than in cadavers.
Conclusions: Our results should improve the awareness of anatomical variations
in the first dorsal compartment, which in turn should have impact on treatment
of de Quervain’s disease in clinical practice.

Get Citation

Keywords

de Quervain’s disease, abductor pollicis longus, extensor pollicis brevis

About this article
Title

Anatomical variations in the first dorsal compartment of the wrist: meta-analysis

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 4 (2023)

Article type

Review article

Pages

766-776

Published online

2022-09-27

Page views

1309

Article views/downloads

760

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0081

Pubmed

36165900

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(4):766-776.

Keywords

de Quervain’s disease
abductor pollicis longus
extensor pollicis brevis

Authors

M. Bonczar
J. Walocha
A. Pasternak
P. Depukat
M. Dziedzic
P. Ostrowski
T. Bonczar
Ł. Warchoł
M. Koziej

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