open access

Vol 82, No 3 (2023)
Original article
Submitted: 2022-05-26
Accepted: 2022-06-30
Published online: 2022-07-08
Get Citation

Correlation between glenoid bone structure and recurrent anterior dislocation of the shoulder joint

Q. Zhao1, D. Jin1, H. Yuan1
·
Pubmed: 35818805
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(3):712-720.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, China

open access

Vol 82, No 3 (2023)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2022-05-26
Accepted: 2022-06-30
Published online: 2022-07-08

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to investigate the anatomical characteristics
and symmetry of the bilateral glenoid structures of Chinese people and
to explore the relationship between the glenoid bone structure and recurrent
anterior dislocation.
Materials and methods: The control group included 131 individuals with no
history of shoulder dislocation. The dislocation group consisted of 131 patients
with a history of unilateral shoulder dislocation. All subjects underwent computed
tomography scans. Glenoid shape (pear-shaped, inverted comma-shaped,
oval-shaped), width, height, depth, version angle, area, maximum fitting circle
area and volume were measured.
Results: There was no significant difference in normal bilateral glenoid of Chinese
people (p > 0.05). There were statistically significant differences in depth, height
to width ratio, maximum fitting circle area and shape between the dislocation and
control groups (p < 0.05). Regression analyses showed that the glenoid depth
(odds ratio [OR] 0.48; p < 0.01), the glenoid height to width ratio (OR 28.61;
p < 0.01), the glenoid maximum fitting circle area (OR 1.01; p < 0.01) and the
glenoid shape (p <0.05; pear-shaped OR 0.432; inverted comma-shaped OR
0.954) were associated with anterior shoulder instability. Pear-shaped and inverted
comma-shaped glenoid had lower risk of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation
compared to oval glenoid. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed
that individuals with anterior shoulder instability had smaller glenoid depth and
larger height to width ratio and the glenoid maximum fitting circle area compared
with the control group.
Conclusions: The normal bilateral glenoids of Chinese people are basically symmetrical.
The glenoid shape, depth, height to width ratio and maximum fitting
circle area are risk factors for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. Evaluation
of the glenoid bone structure enables more accurate prediction of the risk of
recurrent shoulder dislocation.

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to investigate the anatomical characteristics
and symmetry of the bilateral glenoid structures of Chinese people and
to explore the relationship between the glenoid bone structure and recurrent
anterior dislocation.
Materials and methods: The control group included 131 individuals with no
history of shoulder dislocation. The dislocation group consisted of 131 patients
with a history of unilateral shoulder dislocation. All subjects underwent computed
tomography scans. Glenoid shape (pear-shaped, inverted comma-shaped,
oval-shaped), width, height, depth, version angle, area, maximum fitting circle
area and volume were measured.
Results: There was no significant difference in normal bilateral glenoid of Chinese
people (p > 0.05). There were statistically significant differences in depth, height
to width ratio, maximum fitting circle area and shape between the dislocation and
control groups (p < 0.05). Regression analyses showed that the glenoid depth
(odds ratio [OR] 0.48; p < 0.01), the glenoid height to width ratio (OR 28.61;
p < 0.01), the glenoid maximum fitting circle area (OR 1.01; p < 0.01) and the
glenoid shape (p <0.05; pear-shaped OR 0.432; inverted comma-shaped OR
0.954) were associated with anterior shoulder instability. Pear-shaped and inverted
comma-shaped glenoid had lower risk of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation
compared to oval glenoid. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed
that individuals with anterior shoulder instability had smaller glenoid depth and
larger height to width ratio and the glenoid maximum fitting circle area compared
with the control group.
Conclusions: The normal bilateral glenoids of Chinese people are basically symmetrical.
The glenoid shape, depth, height to width ratio and maximum fitting
circle area are risk factors for recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. Evaluation
of the glenoid bone structure enables more accurate prediction of the risk of
recurrent shoulder dislocation.

Get Citation

Keywords

shoulder glenoid, recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation, bony structures, glenoid shape

About this article
Title

Correlation between glenoid bone structure and recurrent anterior dislocation of the shoulder joint

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 3 (2023)

Article type

Original article

Pages

712-720

Published online

2022-07-08

Page views

960

Article views/downloads

652

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0067

Pubmed

35818805

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(3):712-720.

Keywords

shoulder glenoid
recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation
bony structures
glenoid shape

Authors

Q. Zhao
D. Jin
H. Yuan

References (26)
  1. Aygün Ü, Çalik Y, Işik C, et al. The importance of glenoid version in patients with anterior dislocation of the shoulder. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2016; 25(12): 1930–1936.
  2. Churchill RS, Brems JJ, Kotschi H. Glenoid size, inclination, and version: an anatomic study. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2001; 10(4): 327–332.
  3. Cofield RH, Kavanagh BF, Frassica FJ. Anterior shoulder instability. Instr Course Lect. 1985; 34: 210–227.
  4. Frazer JE, Viii LP. The Anatomy of the Human Skeleton. 5th ed. Churchill, London 1958.
  5. Gervasi E, Sebastiani E, Spicuzza A. Multidirectional shoulder instability: arthroscopic labral augmentation. Arthrosc Tech. 2017; 6(1): e219–e225.
  6. Grana WA, Buckley PD, Yates CK. Arthroscopic Bankart suture repair. Am J Sports Med. 1993; 21(3): 348–353.
  7. Green GL, Arnander M, Pearse E, et al. CT estimation of glenoid bone loss in anterior glenohumeral instability : a systematic review of existing techniques. Bone Jt Open. 2022; 3(2): 114–122.
  8. Griffith JF. Measuring glenoid and humeral bone loss in shoulder dislocation. Quant Imaging Med Surg. 2019; 9(2): 134–143.
  9. Guan H, Zhang B, Ye Z, et al. Glenoid bony morphology along long diameter is associated with the occurrence of recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation: a case-control study based on three-dimensional CT measurements. Int Orthop. 2022; 46(8): 1811–1819.
  10. Gupta S, Magotra R, Kour M. Morphometric analysis of glenoid fossa of scapula. J Evol Med Dental Sci. 2015; 4(45): 7761–7766.
  11. Hong J, Huang Y, Ma C, et al. Risk factors for anterior shoulder instability: a matched case-control study. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2019; 28(5): 869–874.
  12. Huijsmans PE, Haen PS, Kidd M, et al. Quantification of a glenoid defect with three-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging: a cadaveric study. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2007; 16(6): 803–809.
  13. Hurley ET, Matache BA, Wong I, et al. Anterior Shoulder Instability International Consensus Group. Anterior Shoulder Instability Part I-Diagnosis, Nonoperative Management, and Bankart Repair-An International Consensus Statement. Arthroscopy. 2022; 38(2): 214–223.e7.
  14. Moroder P, Hitzl W, Tauber M, et al. Effect of anatomic bone grafting in post-traumatic recurrent anterior shoulder instability on glenoid morphology. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2013; 22(11): 1522–1529.
  15. Owens BD, Campbell SE, Cameron KL. Risk factors for anterior glenohumeral instability. Am J Sports Med. 2014; 42(11): 2591–2596.
  16. Peltz CD, Zauel R, Ramo N, et al. Differences in glenohumeral joint morphology between patients with anterior shoulder instability and healthy, uninjured volunteers. J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2015; 24(7): 1014–1020.
  17. Prescher A. Anatomical basics, variations, and degenerative changes of the shoulder joint and shoulder girdle. Eur J Radiol. 2000; 35(2): 88–102.
  18. Prescher A, Klümpen T. The glenoid notch and its relation to the shape of the glenoid cavity of the scapula. J Anat. 1997; 190(Pt 3): 457–460.
  19. Provencher MT, Midtgaard KS, Owens BD, et al. Diagnosis and management of traumatic anterior shoulder instability. J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2021; 29(2): e51–e61.
  20. Rutgers C, Verweij LPE, Priester-Vink S, et al. Recurrence in traumatic anterior shoulder dislocations increases the prevalence of Hill-Sachs and Bankart lesions: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2022; 30(6): 2130–2140.
  21. Saygi B, Karahan N, Karakus O, et al. Analysis of glenohumeral morphological factors for anterior shoulder instability and rotator cuff tear by magnetic resonance imaging. J Orthop Surg (Hong Kong). 2018; 26(2): 2309499018768100.
  22. Shi L, Griffith JF, Huang J, et al. Excellent side-to-side symmetry in glenoid size and shape. Skeletal Radiol. 2013; 42(12): 1711–1715.
  23. Stefaniak J, Lubiatowski P, Kubicka AM, et al. Clinical and radiological examination of bony-mediated shoulder instability. EFORT Open Rev. 2020; 5(11): 815–827.
  24. Stillwater L, Koenig J, Maycher B, et al. 3D-MR vs. 3D-CT of the shoulder in patients with glenohumeral instability. Skeletal Radiol. 2017; 46(3): 325–331.
  25. Walton J, Paxinos A, Tzannes A, et al. The unstable shoulder in the adolescent athlete. Am J Sports Med. 2002; 30(5): 758–767.
  26. Wermers J, Raschke MJ, Wilken M, et al. The anatomy of glenoid concavity-bony and osteochondral assessment of a stability-related parameter. J Clin Med. 2021; 10(19).

Regulations

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By VM Media Group sp. z o.o., Grupa Via Medica, Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.: +48 58 320 94 94, faks: +48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl