open access

Vol 82, No 3 (2023)
Original article
Submitted: 2022-02-01
Accepted: 2022-04-11
Published online: 2022-04-28
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Mucous non-goblet cells in the small intestine of guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus): a histological and histochemical study

A. Chende1, V. Miclăuș2, A. Damian1, C. Martonoș1, V. Rus2, M.-C. Matei-Lațiu3, C. Lațiu4, A. F. Gal2
·
Pubmed: 35607874
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(3):624-632.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Romania
  2. Department of Histology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Romania
  3. Department of Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Romania
  4. Faculty of Animal Sciences, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Romania

open access

Vol 82, No 3 (2023)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2022-02-01
Accepted: 2022-04-11
Published online: 2022-04-28

Abstract

Background: The covering and glandular epithelium of the small intestine in
guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) include some mucus-secreting cells. Goblet cells
are specific cells for mucus secretion with a distinctive cup-like appearance due
to the accumulation of mucin in the apical pole. The deep crypt secretory (DCS)
cells were identified in a limited array of species and only recently were noticed
in the large intestine in mice, guinea pigs, humans, monkeys, and pigs. Our study
focuses on the microscopical and histochemical features of the DCS cells in the
small intestine of guinea pigs.
Materials and methods: The samples from the small intestine were collected
from five fully grown guinea pigs that were presented to the Hospital of the
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca (Romania) with severe lesions resulted
from domestic activities. The collected tissue samples underwent fixation in
10% buffered formalin and were later processed by standard paraffin technique.
Mucous substances were detected using the Periodic Acid-Schiff and Alcian-Blue
histochemical stain methods.
Results: The intestinal samples of the guinea pigs assessed had a standard microanatomical
structure. As regards the mucous-secreting cells from the small
intestine, two cell types were identified, i.e. the goblet cells and DCS cells. DCS
cells were only detected in the deep parts of the Lieberkühn glands from the
jejunum and ileum, and were different morphologically and histochemically from
the regular goblet cells.
Conclusions: Our study managed to describe for the first time in guinea pigs, the
existence of DCS cells in the jejunum and ileum of the small intestine, but not in
the duodenum.

Abstract

Background: The covering and glandular epithelium of the small intestine in
guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) include some mucus-secreting cells. Goblet cells
are specific cells for mucus secretion with a distinctive cup-like appearance due
to the accumulation of mucin in the apical pole. The deep crypt secretory (DCS)
cells were identified in a limited array of species and only recently were noticed
in the large intestine in mice, guinea pigs, humans, monkeys, and pigs. Our study
focuses on the microscopical and histochemical features of the DCS cells in the
small intestine of guinea pigs.
Materials and methods: The samples from the small intestine were collected
from five fully grown guinea pigs that were presented to the Hospital of the
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca (Romania) with severe lesions resulted
from domestic activities. The collected tissue samples underwent fixation in
10% buffered formalin and were later processed by standard paraffin technique.
Mucous substances were detected using the Periodic Acid-Schiff and Alcian-Blue
histochemical stain methods.
Results: The intestinal samples of the guinea pigs assessed had a standard microanatomical
structure. As regards the mucous-secreting cells from the small
intestine, two cell types were identified, i.e. the goblet cells and DCS cells. DCS
cells were only detected in the deep parts of the Lieberkühn glands from the
jejunum and ileum, and were different morphologically and histochemically from
the regular goblet cells.
Conclusions: Our study managed to describe for the first time in guinea pigs, the
existence of DCS cells in the jejunum and ileum of the small intestine, but not in
the duodenum.

Get Citation

Keywords

guinea pig, Lieberkühn glands, mucin, deep crypt secretory cells, goblet cells

About this article
Title

Mucous non-goblet cells in the small intestine of guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus): a histological and histochemical study

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 3 (2023)

Article type

Original article

Pages

624-632

Published online

2022-04-28

Page views

1329

Article views/downloads

750

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0048

Pubmed

35607874

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(3):624-632.

Keywords

guinea pig
Lieberkühn glands
mucin
deep crypt secretory cells
goblet cells

Authors

A. Chende
V. Miclăuș
A. Damian
C. Martonoș
V. Rus
M.-C. Matei-Lațiu
C. Lațiu
A. F. Gal

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