open access

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)
Case report
Submitted: 2021-12-05
Accepted: 2022-01-17
Published online: 2022-02-17
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Bilateral accessory head of the adductor longus muscle: an anatomical case study

T. Kozioł1, M. P. Zarzecki1, W. Przybycień1, W. Twardokęs2, J. A. Walocha1
·
Pubmed: 35187634
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(2):416-421.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland
  2. Department of Histology, Cytophysiology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine in Zabrze, University of Technology in Katowice, Zabrze, Poland

open access

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2021-12-05
Accepted: 2022-01-17
Published online: 2022-02-17

Abstract

The adductor longus muscle, with its proximal origin at the pubic bone and distal at the linea aspera, is reported to be one of the most frequently injured groin muscles in contact sports, namely football or ice hockey. Notwithstanding, there is a scarcity of published works regarding the accessory heads of the adductor longus muscle in the existing literature, let alone the clinical significance of the said variant.
The following study is a case report describing bilateral accessory heads of the adductor longus muscle in a 97-year-old female cadaver. A routine cadaveric dissection revealed two accessory heads on the right thigh and one on the left thigh of a donor with no known structural or pathological abnormalities of the proximal lower extremity. The anterior division of the obturator nerve provided nerve supply to the variants on both sides. The deep femoral, superficial external pudendal, femoral vessels were responsible for the vascular supply to the accessory heads of the adductor longus.
Undoubtedly, extensive knowledge regarding the variant anatomy of the hip adductor muscles is of immense importance to physiotherapists and orthopaedists treating patients for their injury or complete tears. Nonetheless, there is little information regarding the accessory heads of the adductor longus in the existing literature (originating mostly from cadaveric studies) that requires further evaluation in vivo to assess whether this variant might have an impact on a patient’s everyday life.

Abstract

The adductor longus muscle, with its proximal origin at the pubic bone and distal at the linea aspera, is reported to be one of the most frequently injured groin muscles in contact sports, namely football or ice hockey. Notwithstanding, there is a scarcity of published works regarding the accessory heads of the adductor longus muscle in the existing literature, let alone the clinical significance of the said variant.
The following study is a case report describing bilateral accessory heads of the adductor longus muscle in a 97-year-old female cadaver. A routine cadaveric dissection revealed two accessory heads on the right thigh and one on the left thigh of a donor with no known structural or pathological abnormalities of the proximal lower extremity. The anterior division of the obturator nerve provided nerve supply to the variants on both sides. The deep femoral, superficial external pudendal, femoral vessels were responsible for the vascular supply to the accessory heads of the adductor longus.
Undoubtedly, extensive knowledge regarding the variant anatomy of the hip adductor muscles is of immense importance to physiotherapists and orthopaedists treating patients for their injury or complete tears. Nonetheless, there is little information regarding the accessory heads of the adductor longus in the existing literature (originating mostly from cadaveric studies) that requires further evaluation in vivo to assess whether this variant might have an impact on a patient’s everyday life.

Get Citation

Keywords

adductor longus, anatomical variation, anatomy, orthopaedics, physiotherapy

About this article
Title

Bilateral accessory head of the adductor longus muscle: an anatomical case study

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)

Article type

Case report

Pages

416-421

Published online

2022-02-17

Page views

2429

Article views/downloads

952

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0015

Pubmed

35187634

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(2):416-421.

Keywords

adductor longus
anatomical variation
anatomy
orthopaedics
physiotherapy

Authors

T. Kozioł
M. P. Zarzecki
W. Przybycień
W. Twardokęs
J. A. Walocha

References (19)
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