open access

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)
Case report
Submitted: 2021-12-02
Accepted: 2022-01-05
Published online: 2022-01-31
Get Citation

Accessory anterior ethmoidal nerve and artery: a cadaveric case report

D. Hage1, J. Iwanaga1234, A. Danaei5, A. Sadr6, R. S. Tubbs127891011
·
Pubmed: 35112337
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(1):183-186.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane Centre for Clinical Neurosciences, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  2. Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  3. Dental and Oral Medical Centre, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan
  4. Division of Gross and Clinical Anatomy, Department of Anatomy, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan
  5. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  6. Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Washington School of Dentistry, Seattle, WA, United States
  7. Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George’s University, St. George’s, Grenada, West Indies
  8. Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  9. Department of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  10. Department of Neurosurgery and Ochsner Neuroscience Institute, Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, LA, United States
  11. University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia

open access

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2021-12-02
Accepted: 2022-01-05
Published online: 2022-01-31

Abstract

The anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) is an important surgical landmark for procedures involving the anterior cranial fossa. Many variations in the location and branching pattern of the AEA have been reported throughout the literature. These anatomical variations are important for surgeons to be familiar with as injury to the AEA can lead to massive haemorrhage, orbital haematomas, and cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea. Anatomical landmarks such as the ethmoidal foramen can be used to identify the location of the AEA; however, it is also important to consider that the foramen may have variable presentations. If there is ever difficulty with identification of the AEA, surgeons should pursue a high-resolution computed tomography to minimise the risk of surgical complications. In this report, we present a rare case of a variant accessory anterior ethmoidal artery and nerve, and variations in the ethmoidal foramen found during cadaveric dissection.

Abstract

The anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) is an important surgical landmark for procedures involving the anterior cranial fossa. Many variations in the location and branching pattern of the AEA have been reported throughout the literature. These anatomical variations are important for surgeons to be familiar with as injury to the AEA can lead to massive haemorrhage, orbital haematomas, and cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea. Anatomical landmarks such as the ethmoidal foramen can be used to identify the location of the AEA; however, it is also important to consider that the foramen may have variable presentations. If there is ever difficulty with identification of the AEA, surgeons should pursue a high-resolution computed tomography to minimise the risk of surgical complications. In this report, we present a rare case of a variant accessory anterior ethmoidal artery and nerve, and variations in the ethmoidal foramen found during cadaveric dissection.

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Keywords

anterior ethmoidal artery, anterior ethmoidal nerve, anatomy, variations, orbit

About this article
Title

Accessory anterior ethmoidal nerve and artery: a cadaveric case report

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)

Article type

Case report

Pages

183-186

Published online

2022-01-31

Page views

3594

Article views/downloads

933

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0011

Pubmed

35112337

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(1):183-186.

Keywords

anterior ethmoidal artery
anterior ethmoidal nerve
anatomy
variations
orbit

Authors

D. Hage
J. Iwanaga
A. Danaei
A. Sadr
R. S. Tubbs

References (17)
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