open access

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)
Original article
Submitted: 2021-11-15
Accepted: 2022-01-17
Published online: 2022-01-31
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The structure of the rostral epidural rete mirabile and caudal epidural rete mirabile of the domestic pig

S. Graczyk1, M. Zdun1
·
Pubmed: 35112335
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(2):261-268.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Basic and Preclinical Sciences, Institute of Veterinary Medicine, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, Poland

open access

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2021-11-15
Accepted: 2022-01-17
Published online: 2022-01-31

Abstract

Background: The rostral epidural rete mirabile in the domestic pig has been
studied by many scientists; however, the caudal epidural rete mirabile has been
poorly understood and is rarely mentioned in the literature in domestic pig species.
Based on the role of the rostral epidural rete mirabile in retrograde transfer
of neurotransmitters and its localisation and structure, we hypothesize that the
caudal rete may also play an important role in this process.
Materials and methods: The study was conducted on 80 domestic pigs (Sus
scrofa domestica) of the Suidae family, including 60 piglets aged 0–20 days and
20 adult animals aged 5–9 months.
Results: The rostral epidural rete mirabile is an even well-developed structure
consisting of dozens of anastomosing arterioles embedded in the cavernous
sinus, formed by the maxillary and external ocular artery branches, which are
extensions of the external carotid artery, and a thick branch to the rostral epidural
rete mirabile. However, the caudal epidural rete mirabile is a structure made up
of several interlacing arterioles consisting of the vertebral, condylar and occipital
arteries on the caudal side, while on the rostral side it is made up of the middle
meningeal artery branching off the inner surface of the temporal bone.
Conclusions: The whole caudal epidural rete mirabile is embedded in the basilar
and occipital sinuses, which led us to hypothesise that in these sinuses a retrograde
transfer of neurotransmitters may take place analogous to the rostral epidural
rete mirabile.

Abstract

Background: The rostral epidural rete mirabile in the domestic pig has been
studied by many scientists; however, the caudal epidural rete mirabile has been
poorly understood and is rarely mentioned in the literature in domestic pig species.
Based on the role of the rostral epidural rete mirabile in retrograde transfer
of neurotransmitters and its localisation and structure, we hypothesize that the
caudal rete may also play an important role in this process.
Materials and methods: The study was conducted on 80 domestic pigs (Sus
scrofa domestica) of the Suidae family, including 60 piglets aged 0–20 days and
20 adult animals aged 5–9 months.
Results: The rostral epidural rete mirabile is an even well-developed structure
consisting of dozens of anastomosing arterioles embedded in the cavernous
sinus, formed by the maxillary and external ocular artery branches, which are
extensions of the external carotid artery, and a thick branch to the rostral epidural
rete mirabile. However, the caudal epidural rete mirabile is a structure made up
of several interlacing arterioles consisting of the vertebral, condylar and occipital
arteries on the caudal side, while on the rostral side it is made up of the middle
meningeal artery branching off the inner surface of the temporal bone.
Conclusions: The whole caudal epidural rete mirabile is embedded in the basilar
and occipital sinuses, which led us to hypothesise that in these sinuses a retrograde
transfer of neurotransmitters may take place analogous to the rostral epidural
rete mirabile.

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Keywords

cavernous sinus, swine, retrograde transfer of neurotransmitters, rete mirabele

About this article
Title

The structure of the rostral epidural rete mirabile and caudal epidural rete mirabile of the domestic pig

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)

Article type

Original article

Pages

261-268

Published online

2022-01-31

Page views

2578

Article views/downloads

890

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0013

Pubmed

35112335

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(2):261-268.

Keywords

cavernous sinus
swine
retrograde transfer of neurotransmitters
rete mirabele

Authors

S. Graczyk
M. Zdun

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