open access

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)
Original article
Submitted: 2021-10-28
Accepted: 2021-12-29
Published online: 2022-01-21
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Anatomical characteristics and significance of the metopism and Wormian bones in dry adult-Chinese skulls

J.-H. Li1, Z.-J. Chen1, W.-X. Zhong1, H. Yang1, D. Liu12, Y.-K. Li1
·
Pubmed: 35099043
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(1):166-175.
Affiliations
  1. School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, P.R. China
  2. Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, P.R. China

open access

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2021-10-28
Accepted: 2021-12-29
Published online: 2022-01-21

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to investigate the incidence, topographical distribution, morphology, and interrelationship of the metopism and Wormian bones (WBs) in dry adult-Chinese skulls.
Materials and methods: In this study, 285 dried adult-Chinese skull specimens from the Department of Anatomy at the Southern Medical University were examined. The incidence of different types of metopism and WBs were recorded. The length of the metopic suture was measured using a flexible ruler. Additionally, the lengths and widths of the WBs were measured using a vernier calliper.
Results: The incidence of metopism and WBs in Chinese adults were estimated at 10.18% (29/285) and 63.86% (182/285), respectively. The metopism always accompanied WBs (26/29, 89.66%), but the WBs did not necessarily accompany metopism (26/182, 14.29%). The locations of the WBs in the order of decreasing incidence were the lambdoid suture (78.57%, 143/182), pterion (34.62%, 63/182), asterion (12.09%, 22/182), lambda (8.24%, 15/182), sagittal suture (4.95%, 9/182), and Inca bone (3.85%, 7/182). These locations differed in topographical distribution and morphological patterns.
Conclusions: Chinese adults differ in incidence of metopism and WBs from adults of other races, indicating racial differences. The characteristics of WBs vary depending on the cranial site of occurrence. The metopism always accompanies WBs, but the WBs do not necessarily accompany metopism.

Abstract

Background: This study aimed to investigate the incidence, topographical distribution, morphology, and interrelationship of the metopism and Wormian bones (WBs) in dry adult-Chinese skulls.
Materials and methods: In this study, 285 dried adult-Chinese skull specimens from the Department of Anatomy at the Southern Medical University were examined. The incidence of different types of metopism and WBs were recorded. The length of the metopic suture was measured using a flexible ruler. Additionally, the lengths and widths of the WBs were measured using a vernier calliper.
Results: The incidence of metopism and WBs in Chinese adults were estimated at 10.18% (29/285) and 63.86% (182/285), respectively. The metopism always accompanied WBs (26/29, 89.66%), but the WBs did not necessarily accompany metopism (26/182, 14.29%). The locations of the WBs in the order of decreasing incidence were the lambdoid suture (78.57%, 143/182), pterion (34.62%, 63/182), asterion (12.09%, 22/182), lambda (8.24%, 15/182), sagittal suture (4.95%, 9/182), and Inca bone (3.85%, 7/182). These locations differed in topographical distribution and morphological patterns.
Conclusions: Chinese adults differ in incidence of metopism and WBs from adults of other races, indicating racial differences. The characteristics of WBs vary depending on the cranial site of occurrence. The metopism always accompanies WBs, but the WBs do not necessarily accompany metopism.

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Keywords

Chinese, skull, metopic suture, metopism, Wormian bones, anatomical characteristics

About this article
Title

Anatomical characteristics and significance of the metopism and Wormian bones in dry adult-Chinese skulls

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)

Article type

Original article

Pages

166-175

Published online

2022-01-21

Page views

3429

Article views/downloads

1075

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0006

Pubmed

35099043

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(1):166-175.

Keywords

Chinese
skull
metopic suture
metopism
Wormian bones
anatomical characteristics

Authors

J.-H. Li
Z.-J. Chen
W.-X. Zhong
H. Yang
D. Liu
Y.-K. Li

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