open access

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)
Case report
Submitted: 2021-10-26
Accepted: 2022-01-25
Published online: 2022-01-31
Get Citation

The “sand watch” mandible

M. C. Rusu1, M. D. Stoenescu12, M. Butucescu34, M. Săndulescu5
·
Pubmed: 35112336
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Folia Morphol 2023;82(2):424-428.
Affiliations
  1. Division of Anatomy, Faculty of Dental Medicine, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
  2. “Carol Davila” Central Military Emergency University Hospital, Bucharest, Romania
  3. Faculty of Dental Medicine, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
  4. Division of Restorative Odontotherapy, Bucharest, Romania
  5. Division of Implant Prosthetic Therapy, Faculty of Dental Medicine, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania

open access

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2021-10-26
Accepted: 2022-01-25
Published online: 2022-01-31

Abstract

The lingual surface of the mandible’s body is commonly indicated as presenting the submandibular and sublingual fossae, which are separated by the mylohyoid line. The mylohyoid line attaches to the mylohyoid muscle (MM). Less attention has been paid to the ‘mylohyoid boutonnières’, which allow the ‘sublingual buttons’ to pass through the mylohyoid muscle in the submandibular space. The cone-beam computed tomography files of patients were routinely examined for anatomical studies. Two cases were found with unexpected morphologies of the mandible’s body — the mylohyoid lines were incomplete anteriorly, and herniated sublingual tissue determined an additional fossa inferior to that line in the premolar region. That fossa was termed the ‘accessory submandibular fossa’. It determined on coronal slices a ‘sand watch’ contour of the mandible’s body. With such a peculiar morphology, the mandible is more prone to fracture. Moreover, when inserting endosseous implants, the procedure should be carefully personalised in such rare cases.

Abstract

The lingual surface of the mandible’s body is commonly indicated as presenting the submandibular and sublingual fossae, which are separated by the mylohyoid line. The mylohyoid line attaches to the mylohyoid muscle (MM). Less attention has been paid to the ‘mylohyoid boutonnières’, which allow the ‘sublingual buttons’ to pass through the mylohyoid muscle in the submandibular space. The cone-beam computed tomography files of patients were routinely examined for anatomical studies. Two cases were found with unexpected morphologies of the mandible’s body — the mylohyoid lines were incomplete anteriorly, and herniated sublingual tissue determined an additional fossa inferior to that line in the premolar region. That fossa was termed the ‘accessory submandibular fossa’. It determined on coronal slices a ‘sand watch’ contour of the mandible’s body. With such a peculiar morphology, the mandible is more prone to fracture. Moreover, when inserting endosseous implants, the procedure should be carefully personalised in such rare cases.

Get Citation

Keywords

mandible, cone-beam computed tomography, mental foramen, premolar teeth, sublingual fossa, endosseous implants

About this article
Title

The “sand watch” mandible

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 2 (2023)

Article type

Case report

Pages

424-428

Published online

2022-01-31

Page views

2702

Article views/downloads

1525

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0012

Pubmed

35112336

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(2):424-428.

Keywords

mandible
cone-beam computed tomography
mental foramen
premolar teeth
sublingual fossa
endosseous implants

Authors

M. C. Rusu
M. D. Stoenescu
M. Butucescu
M. Săndulescu

References (23)
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