open access

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)
Original article
Submitted: 2021-10-05
Accepted: 2021-12-12
Published online: 2022-01-17
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Anatomical description of the perforating cutaneous nerve

K. Shafarenko1, J. A. Walocha1, R. S. Tubbs23456, K. Jankowska1, A. Mazurek1
·
Pubmed: 35099048
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(1):88-95.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomy, Jagiellonian University Medical College, Krakow, Poland
  2. Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane Centre for Clinical Neurosciences, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  3. Department of Neurosurgery and Ochsner Neuroscience Institute, Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, LA, United States
  4. Department of Neurology, Tulane Centre for Clinical Neurosciences, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  5. Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George’s University, Grenada, West Indies
  6. Department of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States

open access

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Submitted: 2021-10-05
Accepted: 2021-12-12
Published online: 2022-01-17

Abstract

Background: The perforating cutaneous nerve/perforating nerve of the sacrotuberous ligament is rarely observed. It usually arises from the posterior division of the sacral plexus or the pudendal nerve and perforates the sacrotuberous ligament. The anatomy of this nerve and its variants is poorly described in the literature, but there are data indicating its role in pudendal neuralgia.
Materials and methods: Herein, we present an anatomical study of six formalin-fixed cadavers with descriptions of the topography of spinal nerves S2-S4, the pudendal bundle, the perforating cutaneous nerve and the sacrotuberous ligament.
Results: We found three perforating cutaneous nerves and described each of them in detail, with measurements of length and width, and point of perforation of the sacrotuberous ligament.
Conclusions: We distinguished three types of perforating cutaneous nerve on the basis of our findings and previous publications; two of the three types were observed in our study.

Abstract

Background: The perforating cutaneous nerve/perforating nerve of the sacrotuberous ligament is rarely observed. It usually arises from the posterior division of the sacral plexus or the pudendal nerve and perforates the sacrotuberous ligament. The anatomy of this nerve and its variants is poorly described in the literature, but there are data indicating its role in pudendal neuralgia.
Materials and methods: Herein, we present an anatomical study of six formalin-fixed cadavers with descriptions of the topography of spinal nerves S2-S4, the pudendal bundle, the perforating cutaneous nerve and the sacrotuberous ligament.
Results: We found three perforating cutaneous nerves and described each of them in detail, with measurements of length and width, and point of perforation of the sacrotuberous ligament.
Conclusions: We distinguished three types of perforating cutaneous nerve on the basis of our findings and previous publications; two of the three types were observed in our study.

Get Citation

Keywords

perforating cutaneous nerve, sacrotuberous ligament, pudendal nerve, pudendal neuralgia, anatomy

About this article
Title

Anatomical description of the perforating cutaneous nerve

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)

Article type

Original article

Pages

88-95

Published online

2022-01-17

Page views

3331

Article views/downloads

1279

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2022.0001

Pubmed

35099048

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(1):88-95.

Keywords

perforating cutaneous nerve
sacrotuberous ligament
pudendal nerve
pudendal neuralgia
anatomy

Authors

K. Shafarenko
J. A. Walocha
R. S. Tubbs
K. Jankowska
A. Mazurek

References (10)
  1. Bochenek A, Reicher M. Anatomia człowieka. Tom V. Wydawnictwo Lekarskie PZWL 2008.
  2. Bohrer JC, Chen CC, Walters MD. Pudendal neuropathy involving the perforating cutaneous nerve after cystocele repair with graft. Obstet Gynecol. 2008; 112(2 Pt 2): 496–498.
  3. Florian-Rodriguez ME, Hare A, Chin K, et al. Inferior gluteal and other nerves associated with sacrospinous ligament: a cadaver study. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2016; 215(5): 646.e1–646.e6.
  4. Gray H. Anatomy of the human body. Bartley.com 2000.
  5. Iwanaga J, Singh V, Takeda S, et al. Acknowledging the use of human cadaveric tissues in research papers: Recommendations from anatomical journal editors. Clin Anat. 2021; 34(1): 2–4.
  6. Mahakkanukrauh P, Surin P, Vaidhayakarn P. Anatomical study of the pudendal nerve adjacent to the sacrospinous ligament. Clin Anat. 2005; 18(3): 200–205.
  7. Montoya TI, Calver L, Carrick KS, et al. Anatomic relationships of the pudendal nerve branches. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2011; 205(5): 504.e1–504.e5.
  8. Pirro N, Sielezneff I, Le Corroller T, et al. Surgical anatomy of the extrapelvic part of the pudendal nerve and its applications for clinical practice. Surg Radiol Anat. 2009; 31(10): 769–773.
  9. Ploteau S, Perrouin-Verbe MA, Labat JJ. Anatomical variants of the pudendal nerve observed during a transgluteal surgical approachin a population of patients with pudendal neuralgia. Pain Physician. 2017; 20(1): E137–E143.
  10. Tubbs RS, Iwanaga J, Loukas M, Dumont AS, Reina MA. Surgical anatomy of the sacral plexus and its branches. Elsevier, Philadelphia 2021.

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