open access

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)
Case report
Submitted: 2021-10-02
Accepted: 2021-10-14
Published online: 2021-11-09
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The ulnar head of the pronator teres muscle originating from the third head of the biceps brachii: a very rare case

Ł. Olewnik1, N. Zielinska1, B. Szewczyk1, R. S. Tubbs234567
·
Pubmed: 34783003
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(1):225-230.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Anatomical Dissection and Donation, Medical University of Lodz, Poland
  2. Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George’s University, Grenada, West Indies
  3. Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  4. Department of Neurology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  5. Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  6. Department of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  7. Department of Neurosurgery, Ochsner Medical Centre, New Orleans, LA, United States

open access

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2021-10-02
Accepted: 2021-10-14
Published online: 2021-11-09

Abstract

The biceps brachii is located in the anterior compartment of the arm, which can show numerous morphological variations. During anatomical dissection, an interesting additional muscle was found: the third head of the biceps brachii originated from the short head of the same muscle. The 97.77 mm long muscle belly was directed medially over the arm and then passed into the common tendon (15.97 mm), which thereafter split into aponeurosis and tendon. The 26.33 mm aponeurosis passed and joined the fascia of the forearm. The tendon of the third head of the biceps brachii then gave rise to the ulnar head of the pronator teres muscle. Such an accessory structure could cause neurovascular compression involving the brachial artery and median nerve. Knowledge of the morphological variability of this region is essential not only for anatomists but also for clinicians.

Abstract

The biceps brachii is located in the anterior compartment of the arm, which can show numerous morphological variations. During anatomical dissection, an interesting additional muscle was found: the third head of the biceps brachii originated from the short head of the same muscle. The 97.77 mm long muscle belly was directed medially over the arm and then passed into the common tendon (15.97 mm), which thereafter split into aponeurosis and tendon. The 26.33 mm aponeurosis passed and joined the fascia of the forearm. The tendon of the third head of the biceps brachii then gave rise to the ulnar head of the pronator teres muscle. Such an accessory structure could cause neurovascular compression involving the brachial artery and median nerve. Knowledge of the morphological variability of this region is essential not only for anatomists but also for clinicians.

Get Citation

Keywords

anatomical variations, biceps brachii, third head

About this article
Title

The ulnar head of the pronator teres muscle originating from the third head of the biceps brachii: a very rare case

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)

Article type

Case report

Pages

225-230

Published online

2021-11-09

Page views

3540

Article views/downloads

923

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0122

Pubmed

34783003

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(1):225-230.

Keywords

anatomical variations
biceps brachii
third head

Authors

Ł. Olewnik
N. Zielinska
B. Szewczyk
R. S. Tubbs

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