open access

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)
Case report
Submitted: 2021-08-25
Accepted: 2021-10-20
Published online: 2021-11-16
Get Citation

Ascending palatine branch from the lingual artery with multiple other variations of the external carotid artery

C. Escoffier1, D. Hage2, T. Tanaka3, R. S. Tubbs345678, J. Iwanaga24910
·
Pubmed: 34826135
·
Folia Morphol 2023;82(1):205-210.
Affiliations
  1. College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States
  2. Department of Neurosurgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  3. Department of Periodontology, College of Dentistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States
  4. Department of Neurology, Tulane Centre for Clinical Neurosciences, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  5. Department of Anatomical Sciences, St. George’s University, St. George’s, Grenada, West Indies
  6. Department of Structural and Cellular Biology, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  7. Department of Neurosurgery and Ochsner Neuroscience Institute, Ochsner Health System, New Orleans, LA, United States
  8. Department of Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, United States
  9. Dental and Oral Medical Centre, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan
  10. Division of Gross and Clinical Anatomy, Department of Anatomy, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan

open access

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)
CASE REPORTS
Submitted: 2021-08-25
Accepted: 2021-10-20
Published online: 2021-11-16

Abstract

The external carotid artery (ECA) is the major blood supply for structures in the head and neck. Typically, it has 8 separate branches; but there are many anatomical variations, making it difficult to predict surgical outcomes and complications without 3-dimensional imaging. This case study focuses on a cadaver with multiple anatomical variations in the ECA, i.e., lingual, facial, occipital, ascending pharyngeal, and posterior auricular arteries, found during routine dissection of the right cadaveric neck. We also discuss the incidences of several other anatomical variations of the ECA branches and their surgical implications and potential complications.

Abstract

The external carotid artery (ECA) is the major blood supply for structures in the head and neck. Typically, it has 8 separate branches; but there are many anatomical variations, making it difficult to predict surgical outcomes and complications without 3-dimensional imaging. This case study focuses on a cadaver with multiple anatomical variations in the ECA, i.e., lingual, facial, occipital, ascending pharyngeal, and posterior auricular arteries, found during routine dissection of the right cadaveric neck. We also discuss the incidences of several other anatomical variations of the ECA branches and their surgical implications and potential complications.

Get Citation

Keywords

lingofacial trunk, external carotid artery, anatomy, variation, cadaver

About this article
Title

Ascending palatine branch from the lingual artery with multiple other variations of the external carotid artery

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 82, No 1 (2023)

Article type

Case report

Pages

205-210

Published online

2021-11-16

Page views

3412

Article views/downloads

1399

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2021.0124

Pubmed

34826135

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2023;82(1):205-210.

Keywords

lingofacial trunk
external carotid artery
anatomy
variation
cadaver

Authors

C. Escoffier
D. Hage
T. Tanaka
R. S. Tubbs
J. Iwanaga

References (14)
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  9. Mawaddah A, Goh BS, Kew TY, et al. Isolated blunt lingual artery injury secondary to a road traffic accident: diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Malays J Med Sci. 2012; 19(2): 77–81.
  10. Navakalyani T, Janaki V, Sumalatha Dr. Variant branching patterns of external carotid artery – pharyngo-occipital trunk and occipito - auricular trunk. IOSR J Dental Med Sci. 2016; 15(08): 44–47.
  11. Tubbs RS, Shoja MM, Loukas M. ed. Bergman's Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Human Anatomic Variation. John Wiley Sons 2016.
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  13. von Arx T, Tamura K, Yukiya O, et al. The face – a vascular perspective. A literature review. Swiss Dent J. 2018; 128(5): 382–392.
  14. Yamamoto D, Koizumi H, Ishima D, et al. Angiographic characterization of the external carotid artery: special attention to variations in branching patterns. Tohoku J Exp Med. 2019; 249(3): 185–192.

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