open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-05-18
Submitted: 2020-01-12
Accepted: 2020-03-14
Get Citation

Determination of anomalous pulmonary venous return with high-pitch low-dose computed tomography in pediatric patients

E. Gozgec, M. Kantarci, F. Guven, H. Ogul, N. Ceviz, S. Eren
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2020.0054
·
Pubmed: 32459365

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2020-05-18
Submitted: 2020-01-12
Accepted: 2020-03-14

Abstract

Background: In this study, we aimed to image pulmonary venous return anomalies and associated cardiovascular and pulmonary abnormalities by high-pitch low-dose computed tomography (CT) in children. Materials and methods: Forty-one patients with total or partial anomalous pulmonary venous return anomalous between May 2012 and June 2019 were retrospectively reviewed. The anomalies were determined using high-pitch low-dose CT. The patients’ mean age was 3 years (6 months to 15 years), and 24 of them were female. Results: There were 10 patients with total pulmonary venous return anomalies (TPVRA) and 31 patients with partial pulmonary venous return anomalies (PPVRA). Six patients with TPVRA had the supracardiac type (60%), two had the cardiac type (20%), and two had the mixed type (20%). All patients with TPVRA had a large atrial septal defect (ASD), one patient also had patent ductus arteriosus, and one patient had right cardiac hypertrophy. Forty cases of PPVRA were found in 31 patients. Twenty-seven of them were right-sided (67%), and 13 were left-sided (33%). Twenty patients (65%) also had an additional cardiovascular anomaly (ASD in 12 patients, persistent superior vena cava in 4 patients, patent ductus arteriosus in 3 patients, and aortic coarctation in 2 patients). Of the 27 patients with right-sided PPVRA, it drained into the superior vena cava in 19 patients, the right atrium in 5 patients, and the inferior vena cava in 3 patients. In left-sided cases, the anomalous pulmonary vein drained into the left innominate vein in 9 patients, and in 4 patients, there were accessory pulmonary veins that drained into the left innominate vein. Many of the patients had additional lung anomalies, including pneumonic infiltration (n=12), atelectasis (n=8), and lobar emphysema (n=5), and some of these findings coexisted. Conclusions: Anomalous pulmonary venous drains and associated cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies can be detected reliably and quickly with high-pitch low-dose CT without sedation in pediatric patients.

Abstract

Background: In this study, we aimed to image pulmonary venous return anomalies and associated cardiovascular and pulmonary abnormalities by high-pitch low-dose computed tomography (CT) in children. Materials and methods: Forty-one patients with total or partial anomalous pulmonary venous return anomalous between May 2012 and June 2019 were retrospectively reviewed. The anomalies were determined using high-pitch low-dose CT. The patients’ mean age was 3 years (6 months to 15 years), and 24 of them were female. Results: There were 10 patients with total pulmonary venous return anomalies (TPVRA) and 31 patients with partial pulmonary venous return anomalies (PPVRA). Six patients with TPVRA had the supracardiac type (60%), two had the cardiac type (20%), and two had the mixed type (20%). All patients with TPVRA had a large atrial septal defect (ASD), one patient also had patent ductus arteriosus, and one patient had right cardiac hypertrophy. Forty cases of PPVRA were found in 31 patients. Twenty-seven of them were right-sided (67%), and 13 were left-sided (33%). Twenty patients (65%) also had an additional cardiovascular anomaly (ASD in 12 patients, persistent superior vena cava in 4 patients, patent ductus arteriosus in 3 patients, and aortic coarctation in 2 patients). Of the 27 patients with right-sided PPVRA, it drained into the superior vena cava in 19 patients, the right atrium in 5 patients, and the inferior vena cava in 3 patients. In left-sided cases, the anomalous pulmonary vein drained into the left innominate vein in 9 patients, and in 4 patients, there were accessory pulmonary veins that drained into the left innominate vein. Many of the patients had additional lung anomalies, including pneumonic infiltration (n=12), atelectasis (n=8), and lobar emphysema (n=5), and some of these findings coexisted. Conclusions: Anomalous pulmonary venous drains and associated cardiac and extra-cardiac anomalies can be detected reliably and quickly with high-pitch low-dose CT without sedation in pediatric patients.

Get Citation

Keywords

anomalous pulmonary venous return, high-pitch, low-dose CT, pediatric patients

About this article
Title

Determination of anomalous pulmonary venous return with high-pitch low-dose computed tomography in pediatric patients

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2020-05-18

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2020.0054

Pubmed

32459365

Keywords

anomalous pulmonary venous return
high-pitch
low-dose CT
pediatric patients

Authors

E. Gozgec
M. Kantarci
F. Guven
H. Ogul
N. Ceviz
S. Eren

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl