open access

Vol 79, No 1 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-05-20
Submitted: 2019-04-04
Accepted: 2019-05-04
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Skeletopy of the intumescentia lumbalis and conus medullaris applied to epidural anaesthesia in Leopardus geoffroyi

P. H. S. Mengue, E. C. Souza, F. C. S. Bernardes, M. M. Montana, R. Thiesen, P. de Souza Junior
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2019.0061
·
Pubmed: 31282550
·
Folia Morphol 2020;79(1):65-70.

open access

Vol 79, No 1 (2020)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2019-05-20
Submitted: 2019-04-04
Accepted: 2019-05-04

Abstract

Background: Leopardus geoffroyi is a Neotropical wild felid with wide distribution in the south of the South American continent. The objective was to investigate the skeletopy of the intumescentia lumbalis (IL) and conus medullaris (CM) from 11 specimens of L. geoffroyi collected dead on highways.

Materials and methods: The cadavers were fixed in formaldehyde solution and dissected to allow the dorsal exposure of IL and CM. The cranial and caudal limits were marked with radiopaque pins and radiographic projections were used to determine the skeletopy. The lengths of IL and CM were measured with a pachymeter.

Results: In most specimens, the IL was located at the level of L4 and L5 vertebrae, although in 4 (1 male and 3 females) individuals its cranial limit was L3 and in 3 specimens (2 male and 1 female) the caudal limit was L6. The length of IL was 35.6 ± 6.7 mm. The CM had its base predominantly at the level of the L5 vertebra, although in some specimens the base was in L4 and in others in L6. The apex of the CM can be found since the lumbosacral junction until the level of the Cd2 vertebra. The CM measured 74.4 ± 14.3 mm.

Conclusions: Based on the skeletopy, it can be suggested that epidural anaesthesia procedures in L. geoffroyi are safer with the introduction of the catheter through the sacrocaudal interarcual space, as recommended by some anaesthetists for the domestic cat.

Abstract

Background: Leopardus geoffroyi is a Neotropical wild felid with wide distribution in the south of the South American continent. The objective was to investigate the skeletopy of the intumescentia lumbalis (IL) and conus medullaris (CM) from 11 specimens of L. geoffroyi collected dead on highways.

Materials and methods: The cadavers were fixed in formaldehyde solution and dissected to allow the dorsal exposure of IL and CM. The cranial and caudal limits were marked with radiopaque pins and radiographic projections were used to determine the skeletopy. The lengths of IL and CM were measured with a pachymeter.

Results: In most specimens, the IL was located at the level of L4 and L5 vertebrae, although in 4 (1 male and 3 females) individuals its cranial limit was L3 and in 3 specimens (2 male and 1 female) the caudal limit was L6. The length of IL was 35.6 ± 6.7 mm. The CM had its base predominantly at the level of the L5 vertebra, although in some specimens the base was in L4 and in others in L6. The apex of the CM can be found since the lumbosacral junction until the level of the Cd2 vertebra. The CM measured 74.4 ± 14.3 mm.

Conclusions: Based on the skeletopy, it can be suggested that epidural anaesthesia procedures in L. geoffroyi are safer with the introduction of the catheter through the sacrocaudal interarcual space, as recommended by some anaesthetists for the domestic cat.

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Keywords

carnivorans, Geoffroy’s cat, spinal cord, wild felids

About this article
Title

Skeletopy of the intumescentia lumbalis and conus medullaris applied to epidural anaesthesia in Leopardus geoffroyi

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 79, No 1 (2020)

Pages

65-70

Published online

2019-05-20

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2019.0061

Pubmed

31282550

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2020;79(1):65-70.

Keywords

carnivorans
Geoffroy’s cat
spinal cord
wild felids

Authors

P. H. S. Mengue
E. C. Souza
F. C. S. Bernardes
M. M. Montana
R. Thiesen
P. de Souza Junior

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