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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-06-05
Submitted: 2018-04-26
Accepted: 2018-05-21
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Evaluation of condylar structures on panoramic radiographs in adolescent patients with celiac disease

Mehmet Ali Yavan, Eren Isman, Sayad Kocahan
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0051
·
Pubmed: 30402878

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-06-05
Submitted: 2018-04-26
Accepted: 2018-05-21

Abstract

Background: Celiac disease (CD) is a common disorder that usually originates from calcium malabsorption. Thus, it is accepted that patients with CD have lower bone mineral density than that of healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to assess condylar height, width, area, and perimeter on digital panoramic radiographs in patients with CD.

Materials and methods: Panoramic radiographs obtained from 44 patients with CD were age- and sex-matched with 44 Class 1 (ANB: 2 ± 2°) patients, and outcomes were analyzed. Radiographs were digitized using Image J software, and condylar height, width, area, and perimeter were compared.

Results: Condylar area (cm2) (3.66±1.02), perimeter (cm)  (9.29 ± 1.38), and height (cm) (2.69 ± 0.46) values were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the control group than those in the patient group (area (cm2): 2.52 ± 0.63, perimeter (cm): 8.47 ± 1.42, height (cm): 2.51 ± 0.37), whereas width (cm) (celiac: 2.83 ± 0.63, control: 3.00 ± 0.59) did not differ between the groups (P > 0.05).

Conclusions: These outcomes may be due to the low bone density of patients with CD. A controlled trial conducted using a larger sample is needed to support and extend these data.

Abstract

Background: Celiac disease (CD) is a common disorder that usually originates from calcium malabsorption. Thus, it is accepted that patients with CD have lower bone mineral density than that of healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to assess condylar height, width, area, and perimeter on digital panoramic radiographs in patients with CD.

Materials and methods: Panoramic radiographs obtained from 44 patients with CD were age- and sex-matched with 44 Class 1 (ANB: 2 ± 2°) patients, and outcomes were analyzed. Radiographs were digitized using Image J software, and condylar height, width, area, and perimeter were compared.

Results: Condylar area (cm2) (3.66±1.02), perimeter (cm)  (9.29 ± 1.38), and height (cm) (2.69 ± 0.46) values were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the control group than those in the patient group (area (cm2): 2.52 ± 0.63, perimeter (cm): 8.47 ± 1.42, height (cm): 2.51 ± 0.37), whereas width (cm) (celiac: 2.83 ± 0.63, control: 3.00 ± 0.59) did not differ between the groups (P > 0.05).

Conclusions: These outcomes may be due to the low bone density of patients with CD. A controlled trial conducted using a larger sample is needed to support and extend these data.

Get Citation

Keywords

celiac disease, mandibular condyle, panoramic, orthodontics

About this article
Title

Evaluation of condylar structures on panoramic radiographs in adolescent patients with celiac disease

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2018-06-05

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0051

Pubmed

30402878

Keywords

celiac disease
mandibular condyle
panoramic
orthodontics

Authors

Mehmet Ali Yavan
Eren Isman
Sayad Kocahan

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