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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-07-06
Submitted: 2018-02-26
Accepted: 2018-06-18
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Analysis of corpus callosum size depending on age and sex

Wiesław Guz, Dominika Pazdan, Sylwester Stachyra, Faustyna Świętoń, Patrycja Poręba, Mariola Bednarz, Andżelika Lis, Agnieszka Kazańska, Jadwiga Krukowska, Joanna Klęba, Andrzej Urbanik
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0061
·
Pubmed: 30009363

open access

Ahead of Print
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-07-06
Submitted: 2018-02-26
Accepted: 2018-06-18

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to analyse changes in the size of the corpus callosum (CC) depending on age and sex and to establish the reference values of the morphometric indices of the CC in the Polish population.

Material and Methods: The results of MR studies of 1108 patients performed in the years 2010-2014 were analysed. Two independent radiologists evaluated cerebral images to exclude deviations from normal state. In patients divided according to sex and to 10 age groups, measurements of CC and brain dimensions were made and morphometric indices were calculated. 
Results: The results of measurements related to the following parameters: lengths of longitudinal cross-section of CC (CD), CC thickness in the narrowest place - isthmus (EF), the largest linear dimension of the brain from the frontal pole to the occipital pole (AB), the longitudinal cross-section area of the CC (A1) and cerebral cross-section area (A2) as well as CD/AB and A1/A2 ratios are summarized in 7 figures and 3 tables.
Conclusions: It was demonstrated, that in all age groups there are statistically significant differences in the values of the analysed parameters and ratios of CC size. It was indicated, that there are no statistically significant differences between men and women in the CD, EF, and A1 parameters related to CC size, and the profiles of variations of these parameters are very similar. It was proved that there are statistical differences between women and men in parameters/indicators concerning of the brain size.

Abstract

Background: The aim of the study was to analyse changes in the size of the corpus callosum (CC) depending on age and sex and to establish the reference values of the morphometric indices of the CC in the Polish population.

Material and Methods: The results of MR studies of 1108 patients performed in the years 2010-2014 were analysed. Two independent radiologists evaluated cerebral images to exclude deviations from normal state. In patients divided according to sex and to 10 age groups, measurements of CC and brain dimensions were made and morphometric indices were calculated. 
Results: The results of measurements related to the following parameters: lengths of longitudinal cross-section of CC (CD), CC thickness in the narrowest place - isthmus (EF), the largest linear dimension of the brain from the frontal pole to the occipital pole (AB), the longitudinal cross-section area of the CC (A1) and cerebral cross-section area (A2) as well as CD/AB and A1/A2 ratios are summarized in 7 figures and 3 tables.
Conclusions: It was demonstrated, that in all age groups there are statistically significant differences in the values of the analysed parameters and ratios of CC size. It was indicated, that there are no statistically significant differences between men and women in the CD, EF, and A1 parameters related to CC size, and the profiles of variations of these parameters are very similar. It was proved that there are statistical differences between women and men in parameters/indicators concerning of the brain size.

Get Citation

Keywords

corpus callosum, MR, morphometry, age groups, sex

About this article
Title

Analysis of corpus callosum size depending on age and sex

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Ahead of Print

Published online

2018-07-06

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0061

Pubmed

30009363

Keywords

corpus callosum
MR
morphometry
age groups
sex

Authors

Wiesław Guz
Dominika Pazdan
Sylwester Stachyra
Faustyna Świętoń
Patrycja Poręba
Mariola Bednarz
Andżelika Lis
Agnieszka Kazańska
Jadwiga Krukowska
Joanna Klęba
Andrzej Urbanik

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