open access

Vol 78, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-05-28
Submitted: 2018-02-08
Accepted: 2018-04-17
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Neuroprotective effects of Potentilla fulgens on spinal cord injury in rats: an immunohistochemical analysis

M. Baloğlu, A. Çetin, M. C. Tuncer
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0050
·
Pubmed: 30402877
·
Folia Morphol 2019;78(1):17-23.

open access

Vol 78, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-05-28
Submitted: 2018-02-08
Accepted: 2018-04-17

Abstract

Background: This examination was performed to research the advantage of the antioxidant impact of Potentilla fulgens on spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. 

Materials and methods: In the SCI model of this examination, the tolerably serious lesion was performed at the L1–L2 spinal segmental level. SCI animals were given P. fulgens 400 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally. At 7 days post-lesion, exploratory rats were executed after intraperitoneal administration 7 ketamine HCL (0.15 mL/100 g body weight). Spinal cord specimens were taken for histological examination or assurance of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels and myelope- roxidase (MPO) action. SCI caused a remarkable decline in spinal cord GSH content, trailed by noteworthy increments in MDA levels and MPO action. 

Results: Degenerative changes in some multipolar and bipolar nerve cells and pyknotic changes in the nuclei of glial cells were likewise noticed. Remarkable development was seen in cells and vascular structures of P. fulgens treated groups when contrasted with untreated groups. 

Conclusions: Potentilla fulgens application may influence angiogenetic impro- vement in vein endothelial cells, reduce inflammatory cell aggregation by influ- encing cytokine system and may make apoptotic nerve cells and neuroprotective component in glial cells 

Abstract

Background: This examination was performed to research the advantage of the antioxidant impact of Potentilla fulgens on spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats. 

Materials and methods: In the SCI model of this examination, the tolerably serious lesion was performed at the L1–L2 spinal segmental level. SCI animals were given P. fulgens 400 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally. At 7 days post-lesion, exploratory rats were executed after intraperitoneal administration 7 ketamine HCL (0.15 mL/100 g body weight). Spinal cord specimens were taken for histological examination or assurance of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels and myelope- roxidase (MPO) action. SCI caused a remarkable decline in spinal cord GSH content, trailed by noteworthy increments in MDA levels and MPO action. 

Results: Degenerative changes in some multipolar and bipolar nerve cells and pyknotic changes in the nuclei of glial cells were likewise noticed. Remarkable development was seen in cells and vascular structures of P. fulgens treated groups when contrasted with untreated groups. 

Conclusions: Potentilla fulgens application may influence angiogenetic impro- vement in vein endothelial cells, reduce inflammatory cell aggregation by influ- encing cytokine system and may make apoptotic nerve cells and neuroprotective component in glial cells 

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Keywords

spinal cord injury; Potentilla fulgens; vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)

About this article
Title

Neuroprotective effects of Potentilla fulgens on spinal cord injury in rats: an immunohistochemical analysis

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 78, No 1 (2019)

Pages

17-23

Published online

2018-05-28

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0050

Pubmed

30402877

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2019;78(1):17-23.

Keywords

spinal cord injury
Potentilla fulgens
vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)
B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)

Authors

M. Baloğlu
A. Çetin
M. C. Tuncer

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