open access

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2018-03-21
Submitted: 2018-01-19
Accepted: 2018-02-22
Get Citation

Bilateral bifid mandibular canal: a case report using cone beam computed tomography

R. Fuentes, C. Farfán, N. Astete, I. Garay, F. Dias, A. Arias
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0031
·
Pubmed: 29569706
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):780-784.

open access

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
CASE REPORTS
Published online: 2018-03-21
Submitted: 2018-01-19
Accepted: 2018-02-22

Abstract

The mandibular canal (MC) originates in the mandibular foramen and runs bilaterally through the mandibular ramus and body, ending in the mental foramen. One of the most common anatomical variations is bifid MC, the configurations of which have been classified into four categories and sub-categories. The prevalence of these variations depends on the imaging method used. Studies carried out in panoramic X-rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) show
prevalences varying between 1% and 20%. In this case report we present the finding of a bilateral bifid MC by CBCT examination; we describe its location and morphological characteristics. The variation found was a type 1 bilateral bifid MC, which consists in an accessory canal originating from a single mandibular foramen and extending to the third molar or its immediate surroundings. In this report we discuss the importance of detecting these anatomical variations, as well as their implications in clinical practice.

Abstract

The mandibular canal (MC) originates in the mandibular foramen and runs bilaterally through the mandibular ramus and body, ending in the mental foramen. One of the most common anatomical variations is bifid MC, the configurations of which have been classified into four categories and sub-categories. The prevalence of these variations depends on the imaging method used. Studies carried out in panoramic X-rays and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) show
prevalences varying between 1% and 20%. In this case report we present the finding of a bilateral bifid MC by CBCT examination; we describe its location and morphological characteristics. The variation found was a type 1 bilateral bifid MC, which consists in an accessory canal originating from a single mandibular foramen and extending to the third molar or its immediate surroundings. In this report we discuss the importance of detecting these anatomical variations, as well as their implications in clinical practice.

Get Citation

Keywords

mandibular canal, anatomical variation, bifid canal, cone beam computed tomography

About this article
Title

Bilateral bifid mandibular canal: a case report using cone beam computed tomography

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)

Pages

780-784

Published online

2018-03-21

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0031

Pubmed

29569706

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):780-784.

Keywords

mandibular canal
anatomical variation
bifid canal
cone beam computed tomography

Authors

R. Fuentes
C. Farfán
N. Astete
I. Garay
F. Dias
A. Arias

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