open access

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-03-12
Submitted: 2017-09-19
Accepted: 2018-02-05
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Immunohistochemical characteristics of porcine intrahepatic nerves under physiological conditions and after bisphenol A administration

M. Thoene, L. Rytel, E. Dzika, I. Gonkowski, A. Włodarczyk, J. Wojtkiewicz
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2018.0027
·
Pubmed: 29569701
·
Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):620-628.

open access

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-03-12
Submitted: 2017-09-19
Accepted: 2018-02-05

Abstract

Background: The neurochemistry of hepatic nerve fibres was investigated in large animal models after dietary exposure to the endocrine disrupting compound known as bisphenol A (BPA).

Materials and methods: Antibodies against neuronal peptides were used to study changes in hepatic nerve fibres after exposure to BPA at varying concentrations using standard immunofluorescence techniques. The neuropeptides investigated were substance P (SP), galanin (GAL), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), calcitonin gene regulated peptide (CGRP) and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART). Immunoreactive nerve fibres were counted in multiple sections of the liver and among multiple animals at varying exposure levels. The data was pooled and presented as mean ± standard error of the mean.

Results: It was found that all of the nerve fibres investigated showed upregulation of these neural markers after BPA exposure, even at exposure levels currently considered to be safe. These results show very dramatic increases in nerve fibres containing the above-mentioned neuropeptides and the altered neurochemical levels may be causing a range of pathophysiological states if the trend of over-expression is extrapolated to developing humans.

Conclusions: This may have serious implications for children and young adults who are exposed to this very common plastic polymer, if the same trends are occurring in humans.

Abstract

Background: The neurochemistry of hepatic nerve fibres was investigated in large animal models after dietary exposure to the endocrine disrupting compound known as bisphenol A (BPA).

Materials and methods: Antibodies against neuronal peptides were used to study changes in hepatic nerve fibres after exposure to BPA at varying concentrations using standard immunofluorescence techniques. The neuropeptides investigated were substance P (SP), galanin (GAL), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), calcitonin gene regulated peptide (CGRP) and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART). Immunoreactive nerve fibres were counted in multiple sections of the liver and among multiple animals at varying exposure levels. The data was pooled and presented as mean ± standard error of the mean.

Results: It was found that all of the nerve fibres investigated showed upregulation of these neural markers after BPA exposure, even at exposure levels currently considered to be safe. These results show very dramatic increases in nerve fibres containing the above-mentioned neuropeptides and the altered neurochemical levels may be causing a range of pathophysiological states if the trend of over-expression is extrapolated to developing humans.

Conclusions: This may have serious implications for children and young adults who are exposed to this very common plastic polymer, if the same trends are occurring in humans.

Get Citation

Keywords

bisphenol A, BPA, nerve fibres, endocrine disrupting compounds, EDC, xenoestrogen, child development

About this article
Title

Immunohistochemical characteristics of porcine intrahepatic nerves under physiological conditions and after bisphenol A administration

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 77, No 4 (2018)

Pages

620-628

Published online

2018-03-12

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2018.0027

Pubmed

29569701

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2018;77(4):620-628.

Keywords

bisphenol A
BPA
nerve fibres
endocrine disrupting compounds
EDC
xenoestrogen
child development

Authors

M. Thoene
L. Rytel
E. Dzika
I. Gonkowski
A. Włodarczyk
J. Wojtkiewicz

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