open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-09-28
Submitted: 2016-07-01
Accepted: 2016-08-14
Get Citation

What can anthropometric measurements tell us about obstructive sleep apnoea?

A. Yilmaz, M. Akcaalan
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2016.0058
·
Pubmed: 27714729
·
Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):301-306.

open access

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2016-09-28
Submitted: 2016-07-01
Accepted: 2016-08-14

Abstract

Background: Clinical detection of anatomic narrowing of the upper airway may facilitate early recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The aim of this study was to investigate whether anthropometric measurement can be used to predict OSA.

Materials and methods: One hundred forty-seven subject were included from those patients who were referred to our sleep laboratory with suspected sleep apnoea. All patients were divided two groups with respect to the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI). The first group was diagnosed as OSA, AHI greater than 5. The second group was not diagnosed with OSA, AHI less than 5 (non-OSA control). Anthropometric measurements such as lower face height (LFH), interincisial distance, nose height, anterior neck height (ANH), lateral neck height, posterior neck height (PNH), ramus mandible height, corpus mandible height (CML), bigonial distance (BGD), neck width, and neck depth were assessed.

Results: Patients with OSA had higher body mass index (BMI) and larger LFH, ANH, thyromental distance, CML, BGD, and neck circumference than those without OSA (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.023, p < 0.0001, respectively). There was no difference between the two groups in terms of other parameters.

Conclusions: In this study, it was determined that BMI, lower face height, neck height, mandible length, bigonial width, thyromental distance and neck circumference are in significant relationship with sleep disordered breathing. Thus, these measurements may be used in clinical practice for prediction of OSA.

Abstract

Background: Clinical detection of anatomic narrowing of the upper airway may facilitate early recognition of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The aim of this study was to investigate whether anthropometric measurement can be used to predict OSA.

Materials and methods: One hundred forty-seven subject were included from those patients who were referred to our sleep laboratory with suspected sleep apnoea. All patients were divided two groups with respect to the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI). The first group was diagnosed as OSA, AHI greater than 5. The second group was not diagnosed with OSA, AHI less than 5 (non-OSA control). Anthropometric measurements such as lower face height (LFH), interincisial distance, nose height, anterior neck height (ANH), lateral neck height, posterior neck height (PNH), ramus mandible height, corpus mandible height (CML), bigonial distance (BGD), neck width, and neck depth were assessed.

Results: Patients with OSA had higher body mass index (BMI) and larger LFH, ANH, thyromental distance, CML, BGD, and neck circumference than those without OSA (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.023, p < 0.0001, respectively). There was no difference between the two groups in terms of other parameters.

Conclusions: In this study, it was determined that BMI, lower face height, neck height, mandible length, bigonial width, thyromental distance and neck circumference are in significant relationship with sleep disordered breathing. Thus, these measurements may be used in clinical practice for prediction of OSA.

Get Citation

Keywords

obstructive sleep apnoea, anthropometry, neck, head, airway

About this article
Title

What can anthropometric measurements tell us about obstructive sleep apnoea?

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 76, No 2 (2017)

Pages

301-306

Published online

2016-09-28

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2016.0058

Pubmed

27714729

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2017;76(2):301-306.

Keywords

obstructive sleep apnoea
anthropometry
neck
head
airway

Authors

A. Yilmaz
M. Akcaalan

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