open access

Vol 75, No 3 (2016)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2015-12-22
Submitted: 2015-10-28
Accepted: 2015-11-13
Get Citation

The sciatic nerve in human cadavers — high division or low formation?

A. A. Khan, M. A. Asari, M. A. Pasha
DOI: 10.5603/FM.a2015.0130
·
Pubmed: 26711654
·
Folia Morphol 2016;75(3):306-310.

open access

Vol 75, No 3 (2016)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2015-12-22
Submitted: 2015-10-28
Accepted: 2015-11-13

Abstract

Variations of the sciatic nerve have been extensively studied in the past including its relationship with the piriformis muscle and associated clinical conditions like piriformis syndrome and sciatica. In the present study we noticed some interesting variations of the sciatic nerve, which were slightly different from the cases described earlier. In the previous studies most of the authors described the higher division of sciatic nerve and none of them discussed its formation. In this study we tried to look its formation from the sacral plexus and its divisions in the thigh.

We noticed that in one cadaver the two components of the sciatic nerve originated directly from the sacral plexus and coursed down without merging in the thigh. Should this be called a higher division or non formation of the sciatic nerve? On the other hand in two other cadavers, the two divisions after emerging separately from the sacral plexus, united in the gluteal region and in the thigh respectively. Should we call this as higher division or low formation of the sciatic nerve? In two other cadavers the sciatic nerve emerged from the greater sciatic foramen below the piriformis and divided in the gluteal region itself. Ideally this should be called as higher division of sciatic nerve.

Abstract

Variations of the sciatic nerve have been extensively studied in the past including its relationship with the piriformis muscle and associated clinical conditions like piriformis syndrome and sciatica. In the present study we noticed some interesting variations of the sciatic nerve, which were slightly different from the cases described earlier. In the previous studies most of the authors described the higher division of sciatic nerve and none of them discussed its formation. In this study we tried to look its formation from the sacral plexus and its divisions in the thigh.

We noticed that in one cadaver the two components of the sciatic nerve originated directly from the sacral plexus and coursed down without merging in the thigh. Should this be called a higher division or non formation of the sciatic nerve? On the other hand in two other cadavers, the two divisions after emerging separately from the sacral plexus, united in the gluteal region and in the thigh respectively. Should we call this as higher division or low formation of the sciatic nerve? In two other cadavers the sciatic nerve emerged from the greater sciatic foramen below the piriformis and divided in the gluteal region itself. Ideally this should be called as higher division of sciatic nerve.

Get Citation

Keywords

sciatic nerve, common fibular nerve, tibial nerve, piriformis muscle, greater sciatic foramen

About this article
Title

The sciatic nerve in human cadavers — high division or low formation?

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 75, No 3 (2016)

Pages

306-310

Published online

2015-12-22

DOI

10.5603/FM.a2015.0130

Pubmed

26711654

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2016;75(3):306-310.

Keywords

sciatic nerve
common fibular nerve
tibial nerve
piriformis muscle
greater sciatic foramen

Authors

A. A. Khan
M. A. Asari
M. A. Pasha

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