open access

Vol 72, No 1 (2013)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2013-03-05
Submitted: 2012-05-03
Accepted: 2012-06-19
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Splenomesenteric vein: formally recognising a clinically relevant section of the portal venous drainage system

B. Benninger
DOI: 10.5603/FM.2013.0010
·
Folia Morphol 2013;72(1):63-66.

open access

Vol 72, No 1 (2013)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2013-03-05
Submitted: 2012-05-03
Accepted: 2012-06-19

Abstract

Background and aims: The objective of this study was to identify and examine a common vein in the portal system that is not consistently named, and when named, to assess whether fundamental concepts were applied in the process of naming. Essentially, the portal venous system drains 3 regions of the gastrointestinal system into 3 major veins (superior mesenteric — SMV, splenic — SV, and inferior mesenteric — IMV) ultimately forming the portal vein (PV). The
SMV is formed from midgut veins generally representing the right side of the abdomen. The IMV is formed from hindgut veins generally representing the left side of the lower abdomen and pelvis, classically draining into the SV. The SV is formed from the foregut veins and generally accepts the IMV. The SV then joins the superior mesenteric vein to become the PV.


Materials and methods: Sixty cadavers were dissected to observe the frequency of this morphology. Current anatomy and atlas texts were reviewed to identify the morphology and nomenclature.


Results: Observations from this study identified a vein being formed from the convergence of the SV and IMV the author named “splenomesenteric vein”, which joins the superior mesenteric to form the PV.

Conclusions: These findings suggest re-evaluating the morphology and nomenclature of this structure because of the pathology and clinical relevance of this area.

Abstract

Background and aims: The objective of this study was to identify and examine a common vein in the portal system that is not consistently named, and when named, to assess whether fundamental concepts were applied in the process of naming. Essentially, the portal venous system drains 3 regions of the gastrointestinal system into 3 major veins (superior mesenteric — SMV, splenic — SV, and inferior mesenteric — IMV) ultimately forming the portal vein (PV). The
SMV is formed from midgut veins generally representing the right side of the abdomen. The IMV is formed from hindgut veins generally representing the left side of the lower abdomen and pelvis, classically draining into the SV. The SV is formed from the foregut veins and generally accepts the IMV. The SV then joins the superior mesenteric vein to become the PV.


Materials and methods: Sixty cadavers were dissected to observe the frequency of this morphology. Current anatomy and atlas texts were reviewed to identify the morphology and nomenclature.


Results: Observations from this study identified a vein being formed from the convergence of the SV and IMV the author named “splenomesenteric vein”, which joins the superior mesenteric to form the PV.

Conclusions: These findings suggest re-evaluating the morphology and nomenclature of this structure because of the pathology and clinical relevance of this area.

Get Citation

Keywords

Portal venous system; dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy; portal vein formation; splenic vein; inferior mesenteric vein

About this article
Title

Splenomesenteric vein: formally recognising a clinically relevant section of the portal venous drainage system

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 72, No 1 (2013)

Pages

63-66

Published online

2013-03-05

DOI

10.5603/FM.2013.0010

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2013;72(1):63-66.

Keywords

Portal venous system
dynamic hepatobiliary scintigraphy
portal vein formation
splenic vein
inferior mesenteric vein

Authors

B. Benninger

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