open access

Vol 63, No 2 (2004)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2004-03-12
Submitted: 2012-02-06
Get Citation

The morphology of acinar cells during acute pancreatitis in rats induced by intraductal infusion of peracetate

Jankowski K, Kubasik-Juraniec J, Śledziński Z, Spodnik JH, Woźniak M
Folia Morphol 2004;63(2):179-183.

open access

Vol 63, No 2 (2004)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2004-03-12
Submitted: 2012-02-06

Abstract

Many experimental models have been created to explain the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP). Investigations have been undertaken in this laboratory into the influence of strong oxidants introduced into the pancreas retrogradely through the bile-pancreatic duct. In these experiments a potentially toxic metabolite of ethanol-peracetic acid was used to induce AP. Wistar rats were treated with 1 mM and 40 mM peracetate and with a solvent as a control for 1 and 3 hours respectively. After a period of observation the samples of pancreata were examined in a light and electron microscope together with the content of sulphydryl groups as a marker of intracellular oxidative stress. The morphological examination showed profound changes in the histology of the pancreas and also in its subcellular structures, especially in groups 3 and 4 (with a higher concentration of peracetate). The changes included parenchymal haemorrhage and widespread acinar cell necrosis. The level of the sulphydryl groups decreased in the rats treated with peracetate. This suggests that the severity of the disease strongly depends on the intensity of the oxidative stress. The results confirmed the axial role of oxygen-derived free radicals in the pathogenesis of AP.

Abstract

Many experimental models have been created to explain the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP). Investigations have been undertaken in this laboratory into the influence of strong oxidants introduced into the pancreas retrogradely through the bile-pancreatic duct. In these experiments a potentially toxic metabolite of ethanol-peracetic acid was used to induce AP. Wistar rats were treated with 1 mM and 40 mM peracetate and with a solvent as a control for 1 and 3 hours respectively. After a period of observation the samples of pancreata were examined in a light and electron microscope together with the content of sulphydryl groups as a marker of intracellular oxidative stress. The morphological examination showed profound changes in the histology of the pancreas and also in its subcellular structures, especially in groups 3 and 4 (with a higher concentration of peracetate). The changes included parenchymal haemorrhage and widespread acinar cell necrosis. The level of the sulphydryl groups decreased in the rats treated with peracetate. This suggests that the severity of the disease strongly depends on the intensity of the oxidative stress. The results confirmed the axial role of oxygen-derived free radicals in the pathogenesis of AP.
Get Citation

Keywords

experimental acute pancreatitis; free radicals; peracetate

About this article
Title

The morphology of acinar cells during acute pancreatitis in rats induced by intraductal infusion of peracetate

Journal

Folia Morphologica

Issue

Vol 63, No 2 (2004)

Pages

179-183

Published online

2004-03-12

Bibliographic record

Folia Morphol 2004;63(2):179-183.

Keywords

experimental acute pancreatitis
free radicals
peracetate

Authors

Jankowski K
Kubasik-Juraniec J
Śledziński Z
Spodnik JH
Woźniak M

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk, Poland

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl